Tag Archive for 'movimento'

Italian sport psychologists talk about their job

New trends in Sport psychology, special issue of the Italian Journal, Movimento, 3, 2018

17 Italian sport psychologists talk of your job in sport answering at four questions:

  • What motivated you to start the career of sport psychologist?
  • What do you like of this job in SP?
  • Which are the SP areas where you like to work.
  • Describe your current job in PS.
The experts involved are the following:
Giovanna Barazzutti, Emiliano Bernardi, Sara Biondi, Gladys Bounous, Edoardo Ciofi, Cristiana Conti, Sarah Corazzi, Sergio Costa, Sara Landi, Sammy Marcantognini, Stefania Ortensi, Barbara Rossi, Daniela Sepio, Flavia Sferragatta, Matteo Simone, Cecilia Somigli e Graziella Zitelli.

Sport psychology: new trends and new professional jobs

Alberto Cei (2018). Psicologo dello sport: nuove tendenze e sviluppi professionali, Movimento, 3, 57-66.

Sport psychology is a scientific and professional field in continuous development, as many other areas of psychology and in the last 10 years occurred several situations that have changed this job deeply. This contribution will be described seven areas protagonists of these changes. They refer to: sport psychology and performance psychology, the psychologist in youth programs, sport psychology, performance and stress management; sport psychology and mental health of athletes, sport psychology and disability, sport psychology and physically active lifestyle and sport psychology 4.0. The purpose of this article is to deepen the knowledge in the areas of sport psychology consultancy, providing cues for reflection in relation to where it’s going and how is moving this work context and stimulating the professionals to develop counseling programs, increasingly adapted to the new demands of the sporting world.

Sport psychologist job in Italy

A. Cei (Ed.), Movimento, 3, 2018

Abstract

Sport psychology is a scientific and professional field in continuous development, as many other areas of psychology and in the last 10 years occurred several situations that have changed this job deeply.

This contribute will described seven areas protagonists of these changes. They refer to: sport psychology and performance psychology, the psychologist in youth programs, sport psychology, performance and stress management; sport psychology and mental health of athletes, sport psychology and disability, sport psychology and physically active lifestyle and sport psychology 4.0.

The purpose of this article is to deepen the knowledge in the areas of sport psychology consultancy, providing cues for reflection in relation to where it’s going and how is moving this work context and stimulating the professionals to develop counseling programs, increasingly adapted to the new demands of the sporting world.

Furthermore, this issue of Movimento include a large number of interviews to the sport psychologists to describe their motivations, job, competences and developmental perspectives

Who is interested at this issue of Movimento devoted to the work of sport psychologists in Italy can write and will be linked to the publisher.


Sit less and move more

Age is just a number, and though we are helpless to stop the progress of time, we can easily affect the age we feel.

Sit less and move more to age better.

+ wellbeing with 5minutes of movement each work hour

This research showed that it’s better to move 5m each hour of work. The benefits are evident and improve the global wellbeing.

Audrey Bergouignan et al. (2016). Effect of frequent interruptions of prolonged sitting on self-perceived levels of energy, mood, food cravings and cognitive function. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13:113

While physical activity has been shown to improve cognitive performance and well-being, office workers are essentially sedentary. We compared the effects of physical activity performed as (i) one bout in the morning or (ii) as microbouts spread out across the day to (iii) a day spent sitting, on mood and energy levels and cognitive function.

Methods

In a randomized crossover trial, 30 sedentary adults completed each of three conditions: 6 h of uninterrupted sitting (SIT), SIT plus 30 min of moderate-intensity treadmill walking in the morning (ONE), and SIT plus six hourly 5-min microbouts of moderate-intensity treadmill walking (MICRO). Self-perceived energy, mood, and appetite were assessed with visual analog scales. Vigor and fatigue were assessed with the Profile of Mood State questionnaire. Cognitive function was measured using a flanker task and the Comprehensive Trail Making Test. Intervention effects were tested using linear mixed models.

Results

Both ONE and MICRO increased self-perceived energy and vigor compared to SIT (p < 0.05 for all). MICRO, but not ONE, improved mood, decreased levels of fatigue and reduced food cravings at the end of the day compared to SIT (p < 0.05 for all). Cognitive function was not significantly affected by condition.

Conclusions

In addition to the beneficial impact of physical activity on levels of energy and vigor, spreading out physical activity throughout the day improved mood, decreased feelings of fatigue and affected appetite. Introducing short bouts of activity during the workday of sedentary office workers is a promising approach to improve overall well-being at work without negatively impacting cognitive performance.

Movimento: Italian J of sport psychology

Movimento è la rivista fondata da Ferruccio Antonelli e che dirigo dal 1998. E’ una rivista che ha lo scopo di diffondere la cultura delle scienze dello sport con particolare riferimento alla psicologia e alle scienze umane attraverso la pubblicazione di ricerche scientifiche, di numeri monografici dedicati a temi specifici, di esperienze professionali significative e di best practices.

E’ una rivista autonoma da associazioni scientifiche e professionali che deve la sua permanenza sul mercato all’impegno dell’Editore Luigi Pozzi e al lavoro costante del comitato editoriale alla continua ricerca di temi di riflessioni e di studi da pubblicare.

In questo nuovo 2019, Movimento continuerà a realizzare la sua missione di diffondere i temi della psicologia e delle scienze umane ad allenatori, psicologi, dirigenti sportivi, insegnanti e più in generale si rivolge a chi vuole approfondire le proprie conoscenze in questi ambiti.

Naturalmente, saremo ben felici di ricevere articoli da professionisti e studiosi così come ricevere proposte per l’eventuale pubblicazione di numeri monotematici. Per ulteriori informazioni scrivere a: edizioni_pozzi@tin.it

+ age + physical activity

A new report, produced by Sheffield Hallam University, ukactive and DataHub, argues something health industry professionals have long known to be true – that people should become more active as they age, not less.

Reimagining Ageing, released at the ukactive National Summit in September, says older people’s lives are being cut short by inactivity and paints a compelling picture of how the cost of not tackling this challenge could threaten the NHS.

A few key facts: by 2030 the number of people in the UK aged 60 or over will hit 20 million – up 31 per cent from today’s figure of 15.3 million.

“Our population is ageing fast, with a proliferation of health problems. It has long been assumed such problems were directly caused by ageing, and could, therefore, be neither prevented nor treated,” says Sir Muir Gray, formerly chief knowledge officer for the NHS.

“However, we have clear evidence that ageing by itself is not a cause of major health problems until people are in their mid-90s. In fact, the problems we’ve ascribed to ageing are due to disease – much of it preventable – such as loss of fitness and negative attitudes to growing older.

“The loss of function and resilience we’ve assumed to be the result of ageing can, in fact, be influenced principally by activity: physical, mental and social,” he says.

Getting our ageing population active will require a ‘cultural transformation’ of the perceptions we have towards ageing. As a sector, we must be prepared with the facilities, products, services, programmes and expertise required to meet the demands of an older population.

“We need to inspire a shift in how we approach our ageing years, with a major emphasis on building physical activity in at every step, to ensure long lives are also healthy lives,” says ukactive CEO Steven Ward. “The phrase ‘put your feet up’ is one of the most dangerous in the English language.”

The report calls for whole-society collaborations to create active environments via accessible community facilities, to embed physical activity promotion into the healthcare system and to harness new technology to make activity and exercise the natural choice for older people.

ukactive believes that one solution is Wellness Hubs, where physical activity facilities sit alongside local services such as libraries, police stations and GP surgeries, creating a single community focal-point that offers inclusive, welcoming and holistic physical activity experiences for a broad range of people. Evidence from existing Wellness Hubs has shown a positive impact on local communities, particularly among older populations.

Physically active older adults live longer

Physically active older adults live longer with lower rates of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, cognitive decline, and osteoporosis. If that’s not enough incentive, they also enjoy more independence, balance, flexibility, cognitive function and improved self-esteem.

In order to reap these benefits, people over the age of 65 need at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous- physical activity per week according to Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines.

Looking for ways to incorporate more heart-pumping activity into your week?  Here are some tips to keep you moving:

1) INCORPORATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTO YOUR REGULAR ROUTINE

Bending, squatting, stretching and lifting are all part of everyday activities such as gardening, grocery shopping, and even putting on your socks. Up the ante by sneaking in some resistance-type moves like doing some heavier digging or lifting of grocery bags. Even something as simple as berry picking or walking can strengthen your bones and muscles.

2) KEEP A MOVEMENT LOG

Those who track, stay on track! Noting your activity daily can really help you reach your fitness  goals. Use a wearable tracker, an app on your smartphone, or simply mark your progress in a calendar.

3) GET IN THE WATER

Water supports your body weight and adds resistance. Swim laps or look out for a local aquafit class which can help you build endurance and muscle strength. Many pools have accessible ramps making it easier to get in and out. The warmth of the water can also soothe aching joints.

4) EMBARK ON AN 8-WEEK WALKING PROGRAM

Walking is one of the safest and most enjoyable forms of fitness, not to mention it’s free! Aim for 15 min to start then gradually work your way up to 30 minutes per day. This is a great option for people with arthritis because it doesn’t put a lot of strain on the joints.

5) EXPLORE NEW ACTIVITIES

You’ve probably heard of tai chi (great for building strength and balance!), but have you ever tried geocaching? Participants use a GPS to find containers called geocaches. They’re hidden all over the world so you can participate anywhere. If that doesn’t appeal, go dancing, do yoga, or play pickleball. Trying something new will help keep you motivated and inspired!

6) PLAY IT SAFE

Whatever activity you choose, make sure to start slow, wear appropriate footwear, stay hydrated, and always check with your doctor before starting any new physical activity program.

Review: motor coordination, autism

The sport is increasingly getting closer to the world of youth with autism (ASD) and it can be of considerable help in improving their motor skills and their degree of autonomy, reducing the risk of acquiring a sedentary lifestyle. This review, although published a few years ago, provides valuable information to those who want to propose physical education and sports programs for young with ASD. They are not practical information but those theories, science-based, that who is approaching these young  should know (obviously along with many others).

Motor Coordination in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Synthesis and Meta-Analysis

Kimberly A. Fournier, Chris J. Hass, Sagar K. Naik, Neha Lodha, and James H. Cauraugh

J Autism Dev Disord (2010) 40:1227–1240

The literature focusing on gross motor behavior and development in ASD is plagued by inconsistent findings.

ASD is associated with greater clumsiness, motor coordination abnormalities, postural instability, and poor performance on standardized tests of motor functioning

Several studies failed to detect differences between children with ASD and those with learning disabilities or mental retardation, general developmental delay and language disorders across reflexive, intentional, fine and gross motor tasks.

These studies provide critical information regarding the types of motor impairments seen in ASD, but the specific patterns and sources of motor deficits in this population remain unclear.

Other approaches to elucidating motor components of ASD include neural signaling. Abnormal transmission in the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and GABAergic systems, frequently observed in ASD, may potentially affect motor performance

Individuals with ASD have larger total brain, cerebellar and caudate nucleus volumes; however, the area of the corpus callosum is reduced.

Several related studies in which motor behavior was evaluated using home videos of children later diagnosed with ASD compared to typically developing children demonstrated motor differences within the first 2 years of age.

This review study showed:

Differences in motor performance observed are not dependent upon a specific diagnosis within ASD. Indeed, individuals diagnosed with autism, globally as ASD, or Asperger’s syndrome all possessed significant motor deficits compared to the individuals with normal neurologic development.

An immature postural system may severely limit the emergence and performance of other motor skills.

Movement disturbances such as akinesia, dyskinesia and bradykinesia may affect a person’s ability to initiate, switch, continue or effectively communicate, interact socially, or perform activities of daily living.

That motor coordination deficits were more prevalent in individuals diagnosed with ASD than in controls with neurologically typical development.

Consistent evidence for an increase in total brain volume as well as specific brain regions including the cerebral hemispheres, caudate nucleus, and cerebellum in autism. Conversely, the corpus callosum was consistently reduced in size. Moreover, post mortem studies have detailed increased numbers of altered cortical mini-columns that may lead to a less well-organized cerebral cortex and less integration among brain regions reported children with high functioning autism demonstrated diffusely decreased connectivity across the motor execution network relative to children with normal neurodevelopment.

Children with high functioning autism had significantly smaller grey matter volumes in subcortical, posterior cingulate, and precuneus regions than those diagnosed with Asperger’s. Compared to controls, smaller grey matter volumes in predominantly frontopallidal regions were observed in high functioning autism where as in Asperger’s less grey matter was observed in bilateral caudate and left thalamus. It has been found higher white matter volumes around the basal ganglia in high functioning autism than in Asperger’s or controls. Both ASD groups, however, possessed greater white matter volume than controls. Conversely, both ASD groups had less frontal and corpus collasol white matter.

Taken together these mechanistic findings suggest a broad, large area with disarranged neuronal organization and cortical connectivity across ASD.