Tag Archive for 'errori'

How to manage the momentum according Maria Sharapova e Serena Williams

Some rules to achieve the excellence from two top tennis players.

Maria Sharapova

When you are in a competitive situation and you’re down, what do you do or say to yourself?
“I take my time in between in my service games. I walk to the baseline. I move my strings around. I do a little pep talk, and it’s very automatic. I think it’s more of putting my eyes onto my strings and having this repetition that it doesn’t matter if I won the point or lost the point. I’m on this this river that is going to get to where it’s going no matter what rock is in the way, no matter what storm is on the way. The water is, ultimately, going to go down the river. It’s a safe place for me because in tennis momentum changes so much, just like in life. One second, everything is positive, and you get bad news. You go from a great day to wow. I see those strings, and I see my fingers playing with those strings, and I think of being level headed and being not overly excited, not down. But being in this medium frame of mind.”

Serena Williams

My game is my mental toughness - “Just not only to be able to play, to win, but to be able to come back when I’m down. Both on the court and after tough losses, just to continue to come back and continue to fight, it’s something that takes a lot of tenacity.”

Practice under pressure -  Williams believes tennis is “70 percent mental,”, for this reason she tries to replicate match situations during the sessions. For instance: down 15 to 30 on her second serve. Competitive simulation is a  very efficient coaching method. P

Stay in the moment - many tennis players choke under pressure and tend to unravel when they are behind. It’s important stay there, using our mental strength to win. You reach this goal living the moment: “Even if you’re going through something in life, you can’t rush through it instantly. Take it one moment at a time. It’s the same on a tennis court. You have to take it one point at a time.” Live the here and now.

Forget the mistakes - “Another thing that makes me play poorly is if I’m thinking too much about my last match. I might have won it, but not happy with how I won it,” says Williams. “If you get really upset at mistakes, the best advice I’ve ever been given is to forget about it. You can’t rewind time, you can’t take back that mistake, but you can make it better and not do it in the future.”

 

 

Personal trainer’s mistakes

As a personal trainer, which of these mistakes do you make most often?

Narcissist - He pleased to talk to the client, he uses the charm he feels gifted to bewitch. He puts a lot of emphasis on speaking and choosing words, often difficult or for experts.

Aggressive -  She expresses herself by assuming that she is right and it is obvious the customer must become a member, because the proposed method is infallible. Speak in sentences and exclamation points

Funny - He is more at ease if he establishes from the beginning a friendly relationship with the customer, uses jokes to arouse hilarity, wants to be sure about the success of the customer by making the proposal elementary

Scientist - She wants to convince with objective data of the results. Not interested in understanding the client’s motives and goals. She is self-confident and proves it with documented arguments

Guru – He believes this system as the Fitness Revolution of which he is the master who introduces the student to a new dimension of life

The mistakes teach how to win

Made a mistake does not mean I am a failure as an athletes. Making a mistake is a specific behavior or event. Telling that I am a loser is a global self-assessment. Telling, I lost this competition is an objective evaluation and open the door to do better the next one.

Too often the athletes say themselves:

I made several mistakes → I failed the race.→ I am a loser.

A right assessment could be:

I made several mistakes during this race  → I lost it → I need to talk to the coach (or mental coach) and make a plan to avoid these mistakes.

Do this exercise: Think back to a time wen you lose a competition. Please, rewrite the story so that you don’t condemn yourself as an athletes? Be aware how changing the narrative you tell yourself can improve your confidence.

The challenge for psychologists and coaches

As psychologists and coaches we will teach to develop in our athletes an open attitude towards mistakes if we are willing to accept that we may even fail in this task.

Are we willing to take this risk by getting 100% involved in this challenge?

Or do we just teach sports or psychological techniques convinced that they are enough to become good athletes and save ourselves from the  professional failure?

The main coach task

Teaching young people who want to become expert athletes is a very challenging experience and different from working with adult athletes, who have already reached a high international level. They are young teenagers, boys and girls, who have chosen to devote their lives to the task of discovering if they have the qualities to emerge in sport and to turn their passion into a high-level sports career.

In individual sports, by high level we mean an athlete able to be competitive at the international level. In team sports, we refer to playing, at least, at the level of the two highest level national championships.

We know that once these goals  have been set, they must be set aside because the athletes must focus on what they need to do to improve and lead their daily life. We also know that it is not easy to acquire this mentality because of the mistakes that are constantly made. They test the confidence that must support the athletes in reacting immediately to a single error as well as to an unsatisfying performance.

Teaching young people to acquire this open-mindedness to mistakes, interpreting them as the only opportunity, must be the goal of every coach.

Learning from the mistakes, we learn to learn

Risultati immagini per “I really think a champion is defined not by their wins but by how they can recover when they fall.” ―Serena Williams

Arrigo Sacchi stressed another aspect of this concept, stating that to win you don’t have the problem of winning, otherwise you will never be an innovator.

The objective is therefore “to do things well”, to have a work culture. We all know that “only those who do not do, do not make mistakes”.

If we are aware of this simple truth: we will train our athletes, transferring the idea that making mistakes is a part of the physiology of the race and not something that you can avoid. Let’s train them with this idea and they will become better and more satisfied.

Ancelotti, the referees and VAR

Carlo Ancelotti, during the meeting with the referees, sai that he accepts the mistakes committed by the referees but not the one derived from the VAR.

It is evident from his words that even at the highest level there are less skilled or less experienced referees who make mistakes due to a lack of technical and psychological competences in managing the most important game situations.

It does not surprise me that this lack of competence is still present, because the referee sector is absolutely not engaged in understanding the psychological component of this type of error. I want to remind instead that when Paolo Casarin was the manager of the Serie A referees, about 20 years ago, I was lucky enough to be part of his staff and, contrary to what happened afterwards, we were engaged in identifying the mental component of the referee mistakes and promoting strategies to reduce it. The figure shows that top-level referees make mistakes because of two main factors: the pressure caused by competitive stress and the overload of analysis in decision-making. In all these years, to my knowledge, nothing has been done to improve this situation and, therefore, since individuals do not improve by magic, the referees still continue to make the same mistakes, (Source: Cei Consulting).

Successful coaching in 10 rules

The 10 rules for successful training

  1. Self-awareness - The purpose of training is the improvement and optimization of all the athletes’ skills and the development of awareness of what they can do, what they still need to improve and what they need to learn.
  2. Want to learn - The athlete lives in a continuous process of improving the performances and they must be fully aware of it.
  3. Recognizing opportunities - Training consists of a set of situations to be addressed and resolved with the full commitment.
  4. Commitment with consistency and accuracy – Motivation is based on these two aspects that are the basis of any activity in which the athletes are engaged.
  5. Wanting to take risks - Training is not an exact science and even the best trainings are based on the athletes willingness to take the risk of making mistakes.
  6. Tolerate difficulties - The athletes must be aware that every time they reaches a level of performance higher than the previous one, he detaches the ticket to face new difficulties.
  7. Accepting defeats - In sport, mistakes happen frequently and they must be accepted as unavoidable facts; for top athletes, they may be infrequent but are often decisive in preventing a winning performance.
  8. Give importance to time – To become expert it takes a long time and the athletes must be fully aware of this condition.
  9. Collaborate with coaches and staff - Recognizing the coach and staff leadership is a decisive factor for the athletes’ success.
  10. Analyzing one’s own performance - The athletes must know how to evaluate they performances with specific and precise criteria, without evaluating them only in terms of results.

Make mistakes is a part of the game

Losing is a part of the game in which athletes are involved. Everyone knows it, few people accept it. They close out in shame of not having been able to win a race, to avoid coldly assessing what they will have to do in the next race.

Losing is seen as a wound at ourself: “It means that despite training, I cannot do what I know to do. In this way, the athletes don’t develop self-confidence and this explanation of defeat continues to weigh in the next race. The mind is not free, it is not focused on the present but it is taken to see what will happen this time: “Will I be able to do what I know to do or will I fall back into the same mistakes?”

A vicious circle is established limiting the athletes and the performances, because this negative attitude does not allow them to stay focused on the task, waiting for the catastrophe that at some point will come.

Then the justifications: I was tired, I did not sleep well, I felt the burden of responsibility, everyone expects I perform at my best, “Yes, I could … But it’s difficult… in those moments I don’t react”.

There is a well-established mindset to find alibi for the negative performance and there is no humility in saying: “Ok, I’ve got this and that wrong. Well, next time I want to commit myself to finding solutions to these difficulties.”

Competitions are not a health walk. For athletes the races are extreme tests and those who are most able to deal with the difficulties that the extreme situation offers usually win.

We as sports psychologists can play an important role in determining this awareness and teaching positive ways of living these extreme situations. It is not a problem to make mistakes. It is a physiological fact, because the one who makes the least mistakes wins. Making mistakes is part of the race, even those who win make mistakes. They probably make fewer mistakes and are less influenced by their mistakes.

We chill do mistakes: only those who are presumptuous can think differently. We make one mistake and the next minute we think: “I’ll correct myself in this way.”

How many times do you have to do this? I don’t know, it depends on the duration of the race but one thing is certain:

“It doesn’t matter how many times you fall, but how quickly you get up.

 

Athletes’ 10 more common mistakes

List of the most common mistakes made by athletes starting from their sentences.

  1. the technique solves any difficult situation
  2. I just have to train for many hours and if that’s not enough, I’ll add more hours
  3. it’s always important to do what the coach says
  4. I did everything I had to do to be ready, now let’s see how it goes
  5. the opponent was too strong
  6. I don’t believe that I continue to make the same mistakes
  7. after a while I lose my mind
  8. today wasn’t exactly a good day, I knew it would has been bad
  9. when I make a stupid mistake, I get mad at myself and I make another one.
  10. It was all right until then, but then it was a disaster.