Archive for the 'Generale' Category

The deadly risk of the sedentary life

Strong evidence shows that physical inactivity increases the risk of many adverse health conditions, including the world’s major non-communicable diseases (NCDs) of coronary heart disease (CHD), type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers, and shortens life expectancy. Because much of the world’s population is inactive, this presents a major public health problem.

Worldwide, we estimate that physical inactivity is responsible for between 6% and 10% of the major NCDs of CHD, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers. And, this unhealthy behaviour is responsible for 9% of premature mortality, or >5.3 of the 57 million deaths in 2008. By eliminating physical inactivity, life expectancy of the world’s population may be expected to increase by 0.68 years. This makes inactivity comparable to the established risk factors of smoking and obesity, discussed below. It is important to interpret the added years of life correctly: they appear modest because they represent gains in the whole population (comprising inactive and active persons), not among inactive persons who become active. Because all the gain accrues to those who move from inactive to active, the increase in life expectancy among the inactive alone is greater. For perspective, other research conducted in the United States estimated that inactive persons would gain 1.3–3.7 added years from age 50 by becoming active. And, among East Asians, life expectancy from age 30 among the active was 2.6–4.2 years greater, compared with inactive persons.”

  • Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) kill 41 million people each year, equivalent to 71% of all deaths globally.
  • Each year, 15 million people die from a NCD between the ages of 30 and 69 years; over 85% of these “premature” deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
  • Cardiovascular diseases account for most NCD deaths, or 17.9 million people annually, followed by cancers (9.0 million), respiratory diseases (3.9million), and diabetes (1.6 million).
  • These 4 groups of diseases account for over 80% of all premature NCD deaths.
  • Tobacco use, physical inactivity, the harmful use of alcohol and unhealthy diets all increase the risk of dying from a NCD.
  • Detection, screening and treatment of NCDs, as well as palliative care, are key components of the response to NCDs.

Modifiable behavioural risk factors

Modifiable behaviours, such as tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet and the harmful use of alcohol, all increase the risk of NCDs.

  • Tobacco accounts for over 7.2 million deaths every year (including from the effects of exposure to second-hand smoke), and is projected to increase markedly over the coming years.
  • 4.1 million annual deaths have been attributed to excess salt/sodium intake.
  • More than half of the 3.3 million annual deaths attributable to alcohol use are from NCDs, including cancer.
  • 1.6 million deaths annually can be attributed to insufficient physical activity.”

#Nonfaridere

Fight against online hatred, in particular the messages that mask homophobia, lesbophobia, transphobia, bifobia with the veil of irony: this is the goal of the social campaign “Don’t make people laugh” (“Non fa ridere”) that Arcigay launches within the European project Accept created with Bruno Kessler Foundation.

Risultati immagini per #nonfaridere

Emotion and activation role in sports

It is not enough said that sports, but not only them, should arouse high levels of physical and mental activation and be perceived as pleasant.

We know that many people are stimulate even through the feelings of anger and anxiety, I would say, however, that are not wellness-oriented and positive to teach the young athletes. Even the sports professionals (athletes of international level) have to learn to manage difficult times and competitive pressure with the same approach, taking pleasure and not suffering from their activities. What does it mean to be an athlete of the highest level and live performances with fear/anger and a feeling of unpleasantness.

Thousand of scientists support #Fridaysforfuture

It’s the first time in my life that I’m about to sign a school justification for my kids containing a long, uncomfortable, list of scientific facts and a detailed biography.” So Holger Gies, professor of theoretical physics at the University of Jena, explains the personal endorsement at 180 German climate events scheduled within Fridays for future. Like him other 12,000 including doctors, professors, researchers, science journalists and economists of Germany, Switzerland and Austria today signed the maxi-appeal of support to environmental activists.

The scientific journal Nature  said that thousands of scientists support the movement #Fridaysforfuture:

Academic support

More than 12,000 scientists have signed a statement started by researchers from Germany, Austria and Switzerland in support of the strikes, saying that those countries are not doing enough to keep global warming well below 2 °C — the aim of the 2015 Paris climate accord. Young people’s concerns are “justified and supported by the best available science”, it says.

In New Zealand, more than 1,500 academics have released a similar statement. And last month, a letter from 224 UK academics published in The Guardian newspaper stated that the young strikers “have every right to be angry about the future that we shall bequeath to them, if proportionate and urgent action is not taken”.

“As adults we have abjectly failed,” says Kevin Anderson, a climate scientist at the University of Manchester, UK, and Uppsala University in Sweden, and a signatory of the Guardian letter.

Before most of the children who will be striking were born, scientists knew about climate change and how to respond to it, says Anderson. But a quarter of a century later, people have collectively failed to act — and humanity is running out of time if it is going to restrict warming to 2 °C, he adds.

#fridaysforfuture

Risultati immagini per cortei venerdi 15

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Manuel Bortuzzo show again his optimism after the tragedy

Manuel Bortuzzo, young talent of Italian swimming, injured on 3 February by a gunshot in the Axa district of Rome, tells how his life has changed. “How do I see myself in 10 years? I hope to stand up. To look forward you don’t have to look back, my life is always the same. There is a logistical problem but I am the same as always. I could beat my head and not be myself anymore”

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12 sport psychology journals and there are those who still ignore the progress of this science

How many of those who say that sports psychology is not founded on scientific grounds and continue to use only their psychological common sense or what they consider valid for themselves to train athletes.

How many managers, coaches, athletes and parents choose a mental training program provided by a motivator or a mental coach who does not have a degree in psychology because what matters is “making the athletes get the balls out” motivating them with barracks sentences.

Those who think that the psychologist is for the weak, it is for those who need a pat on the back and someone to complain about.

I want to let everyone know that there are 12 international scientific journals in the world publishing every year the results of research conducted in this field of psychology in all the universities of the world, providing a huge contribution to the knowledge and development of mental training systems and athletes development.

Remember that you can’t say I didn’t know.

Mental disease become much frequent in top sports

From The Guardian

The NBA’s commissioner, Adam Silver, said “many of the league’s players, who have an average salary of $7m a year, were “truly unhappy … The outside world sees the fame, the money, all the trappings that go with it, and they say: ‘How is it possible they even can be complaining?’ But a lot of these young men are genuinely unhappy.”

The NBA All-Star Isaiah Thomas once told him that “championships are won on the bus” with the players having greater camaraderie – and fewer headphones – but times have changed. Indeed one superstar had recently told Silver that from getting off a plane to a game to showing up in the arena he sometimes did not see a single person: ‘I am going to get to my room, stay in my room, get room service and go to the game Sunday,’” Silver said. “He knew if he said it publicly people would say ‘poor baby’.

One study of 50 swimmers competing for positions in Canada’s Olympic and world championship teams, for instance, found that before competition, 68% of them “met the criteria for a major depressive episode”.

The research, published in 2013, also found that the incidence of depression doubled among the elite top 25% of athletes. The authors noted: “The findings suggest that the prevalence of depression among elite athletes is higher than what has been previously reported in the literature.”

Subsequent studies among Australian and French elite athletes have also shown that the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMDs) – such as stress, anxiety and depression– ranged from 17% to 45% of the athletes studied.

Football is no different. A 2017 study of CMDs among 384 European professional football players found that 37% had symptoms of anxiety or depression at some point over a 12-month period. According to the researchers, a professional football team typically drawn from a squad of 25 players can “expect symptoms of CMD to occur among at least three players in one season”.

Tellingly the authors of another study – among footballers in five European leagues – suggested that mental health issues might be higher compared with the rest of the population but pointedly added: “We would like to emphasise how difficult it is to gather scientific information about mental health in professional football, since such a topic remains a kind of taboo.”

Of course elite sport is brutal. Failure is common, career development uncertain. And injuries, overtraining and concussions can also affect mental health. But speaking on Friday, Silver also suggested that an additional factor these days is social media.

So what should be done? Scientists writing recently in the International Society of Sport Psychology journal stressed that the need for athlete and coach education was paramount in removing stigmatisation around the issue and “to expeditiously help when mild subclinical issues are experienced before these issues become mental illness”.

Some have gone public with their issues, including the Cleveland Cavaliers forward Kevin Love, who spoke about a panic attack he experienced on court. As he put it: “Growing up, you figure out really quickly how a boy is supposed to act. You learn what it takes to ‘be a man’. It’s like a playbook: Be strong. Don’t talk about your feelings. Get through it on your own. So for 29 years, I thought about mental health as someone else’s problem.

“I know you don’t just get rid of problems by talking about them but I’ve learned that maybe you can better understand them and make them more manageable.”

It surely helps, too, that Silver is on the front foot and in his players’ corner, driving the debate on such an important issue.

Other leaders world sports would be wise to follow his lead.

Quality must be the most relevant key point of the sport programs with people with intellectual disabilties

The idea that sport is a fundamental activity to develop the motor and psychosocial skills of people with intellectual disabilities is becoming increasingly widespread and it is important to start practicing it since childhood.

Furthermore, sport involvement should permit the integration between young people with intellectual disabilities and peers with typical development, improve people’s overall well-being and allow families to live positive experiences and feel part of a community, the sports community, which values ​​their children regardless of their difficulties.

Realizing these goals requires:

  • A sports club that commits itself to defining a specific and documentable sports program
  • The involvement of the local schools and the ASLs of the national health system in the recruitment of the participants in these programs, and in providing the service of the visit to sports fitness
  • The presentation to the families of the sports program and its aims
  • The choice of professionals working in the field in the realization of the project, who are graduates in motor sciences, sport psychologists, speech therapists and sports doctors and who in turn are trained to work with young people with intellectual disabilities
  • The preparation and implementation of motor tests, interviews with families and psychological assessment systems of the behavior of young people in training which identifies and shows the improvements produced by sport activity during the sports season
  • The organization of public moments with parents and schools to illustrate the progress achieved and the methods used to obtain them

In short, we need to get out of the concept of “doing good” and get in the mentality of “doing it well”. We must be aware that attributing to external problems the difficulty of “doing good” (poor economic resources, poor preparation of the operators, taking as a basic idea that doing something is better than doing nothing) is just an excuse to hide our difficulties to achieve an effective service.

On the contrary, some rules direct the quality of a project:

  • Do well from the beginning
  • Everyone must be aware the quality of the service depends on him/her, regardless of the role
  • Prevent problems before they arise
  • We are a team, we work in groups
  • Measure, evaluate and let everyone know it
  • Identify each year new goals, pursuing a process of continuous improvement

Mistakes coming from a poor awareness coaching

If your athletes commit any of these mistakes, it means that you have not taught them to give value at their commitment in training:

  1. When you ask them to take a deep breath, they snort or sigh
  2. Without no reason they modify times and ways of the warm-up
  3. They say: “But I thought I was ready while …”
  4. They get angry or easily disappointed even in training
  5. In training they have result outcomes  and less frequently process outcomes.
  6. They are focused on the results of their performance and not on how to perform effectively
  7. They are only partially aware that it is how you prepare yourself that determines the quality of the performance
  8. They think: “I have the technique therefor I know how to compete
  9. They are deluding themselves to do well only because they have done it before and they are not aware that every time it is different and the commitment must be consistent
  10. Usually from their favorite champs they take only the most superficial and most glamorous behaviors