Archive for the 'Corsa' Category

How much it’s easy to be choked by the situations

It often happens that athletes are distracted by some event outside them and without to show the readiness to react immediately. In tennis it can be the wind, in sailing the weather, in opposition sports the determination of the opponents, in football a goal taken more for bad luck than for anything else.

The question I ask myself is: how is it possible that athletes who spend so much time to training, do not think they should spend a significant part also to understanding these eventualities? I know I don’t like the wind, the weather of today, the play of that opponent but why don’t I put myself in a position to find the solutions to be adopted to deal with those situations before the competition starts? Why do athletes so often allow it to happen, without taking immediate responsibility for dealing with them?

It’s nice to take responsibility for our mistakes, but it would be even better to understand and react immediately!

Be subjected or control?

“You got a choice – you either come in & let your circumstances control your attitude – or you let your attitude control your circumstances.” Attitude is critical to overcoming adversity.

@BradStevensTeam @Celtics

Risultati immagini per brad stevens you got a choice - you either come in

 

The mistakes teach how to win

Made a mistake does not mean I am a failure as an athletes. Making a mistake is a specific behavior or event. Telling that I am a loser is a global self-assessment. Telling, I lost this competition is an objective evaluation and open the door to do better the next one.

Too often the athletes say themselves:

I made several mistakes → I failed the race.→ I am a loser.

A right assessment could be:

I made several mistakes during this race  → I lost it → I need to talk to the coach (or mental coach) and make a plan to avoid these mistakes.

Do this exercise: Think back to a time wen you lose a competition. Please, rewrite the story so that you don’t condemn yourself as an athletes? Be aware how changing the narrative you tell yourself can improve your confidence.

The challenge for psychologists and coaches

As psychologists and coaches we will teach to develop in our athletes an open attitude towards mistakes if we are willing to accept that we may even fail in this task.

Are we willing to take this risk by getting 100% involved in this challenge?

Or do we just teach sports or psychological techniques convinced that they are enough to become good athletes and save ourselves from the  professional failure?

The main coach task

Teaching young people who want to become expert athletes is a very challenging experience and different from working with adult athletes, who have already reached a high international level. They are young teenagers, boys and girls, who have chosen to devote their lives to the task of discovering if they have the qualities to emerge in sport and to turn their passion into a high-level sports career.

In individual sports, by high level we mean an athlete able to be competitive at the international level. In team sports, we refer to playing, at least, at the level of the two highest level national championships.

We know that once these goals  have been set, they must be set aside because the athletes must focus on what they need to do to improve and lead their daily life. We also know that it is not easy to acquire this mentality because of the mistakes that are constantly made. They test the confidence that must support the athletes in reacting immediately to a single error as well as to an unsatisfying performance.

Teaching young people to acquire this open-mindedness to mistakes, interpreting them as the only opportunity, must be the goal of every coach.

Learning from the mistakes, we learn to learn

Risultati immagini per “I really think a champion is defined not by their wins but by how they can recover when they fall.” ―Serena Williams

Arrigo Sacchi stressed another aspect of this concept, stating that to win you don’t have the problem of winning, otherwise you will never be an innovator.

The objective is therefore “to do things well”, to have a work culture. We all know that “only those who do not do, do not make mistakes”.

If we are aware of this simple truth: we will train our athletes, transferring the idea that making mistakes is a part of the physiology of the race and not something that you can avoid. Let’s train them with this idea and they will become better and more satisfied.

Challenge yourself

“It is our attitude at the beginning of a difficult task which, more than anything else, will affect its successful outcome.”       William James

Risultati immagini per challenge ourselves

Workshop: Performance Behavior in Elite Sports

Next 6 December at the Olympic Center Papendal (Netherlands), a wonderful session on “Performance Behavior in Elite Sports” will be organised by Team Netherlands in collaboration with TOPSport Vrije Universiteit Brussel

The program is addressed to psychologists and other experts working in elite sport, coaches, athletes, technical directors and sport managers and students. Check the link for registration and details: https://lnkd.in/dcMUct4

With: Paul Wylleman, Maurits G. Hendriks, Chris Harwood, Alberto Cei, Suzan Blijlevens, Jolan Kegelaers, Eveline Folkerts, Hardy Menkehorst, Takeshi KUKIDOME, Thierry SOLER, Urban Johnson, Marc Hendriks, Maria Psychountaki, Petra Huybrechtse, Pieta Van Dishoeck, Nynke Klopstra, Hafrún Kristjánsdóttir, PhD, Anaëlle Malherbe, Tanja Kajtna, Sidonio Serpa, Sylvia Hoppenbrouwers, Eefje Raedts

 

 

 

 

 

Fight against #racism in sport

“We are what we communicate.” Let’s tell all club presidents, coaches, fans, parents and sons: words and behaviors tell who we are and what we believe in and everyone takes responsibility for their actions.

#razzismo #Balotelli @ParoleOstili

iRisultati immagini per manifesto della comunicazione non ostile

Mental coaching: when the athletes speak another mother tongue

Psychological preparation with athletes and coaches usually takes place with people who speak the same mother tongue, because sharing the same cultural climate promotes relationship and change.

When I was involved in this consultancy activity in non-English speaking countries such as Cyprus, India, Malta, United Arab Emirates and Iran, I have been aware that English, even as a second language, still allowed for a constructive and equally effective dialogue with athletes.

I recently spent two weeks in China, in Beijing, working with the Chinese national shooting team. In this country, I hav had to cope in a different environment, having to work with an interpreter who, although an expert, limited the relationship with athletes and coaches and consequently I run the risk to reduce the effectiveness of the psychological preparation. As a result, the work done was essentially focused on practical experiences to be carried out collectively in the gym and individually on the shooting range.

In this way, the athletes were able to immediately apply in training psychological strategies and techniques to improve: (a) their ability to be focused in conditions of competitive stress and (b) how to refocus themselves after a mistake or unexpected events.

This experience has further confirmed to me that, even with our Italian athletes, we often spend too much time describing what they should do/think/feel rather than more pragmatically allow them to make experiences of change and optimization of their psychological resources through a specific training consisting of exercises. On the other hand, the athletes know these systems very well, since the physical preparation and technical training are based on the practice repeated over time with the desired intensity.