Tag Archive for 'lavoro'

5 important lessons from the “Inside Bill’s Brain” documentary

A new Netflix documentary series details the inner workings of Bill Gates’s mind, marriage, and philanthropic work, and leaves viewers with important lessons about work, love, and finding their personal definitions of success.

Courtesy of Netflix

The numbers about the psychologists in US and Italy

In 2017, about 3.5 million people in the United States held a bachelor’s degree in psychology.1 Of those:

  • About 499,000 (14%) also held graduate degrees in psychology, with 13% earning a psychology master’s degree and 4% earning a psychology doctorate or professional degree. The overlapping 3% earned both master’s and doctoral or professional degrees.2
  • About 30% held graduate degrees in fields other than psychology, such as education, health and social services.3
  • The remaining 2 million (56%) did not earn graduate degrees.
  • The proportion of psychology bachelor’s degree holders who held a graduate degree was progressively higher from the “ages 24 or younger” group through the “ages 30–34” group, then stabilized, suggesting that the majority of people complete their graduate education by age 30.

In Italy, I found little information available from the web.

The tendency to continue with the studies after the bachelor degree is also evident from the data coming from the Italian Associaton of Psychologists, according to which almost all of the approximately 105,000 psychologists are registered in section A of the register, reserved for those who have in their CV not only the three-year degree but also the graduate degree, plus a year’s training and passing the State examination for professional qualification. Only a few hundred are enrolled in section B, which provides for various limitations on professional practice and which can be accessed only with a three-year degree (bachelor), accompanied by semi-annual training and due state examination. Of the 105,000 enrolled in the register, however, only 60,000 actually carry out the profession of psychologist: there is therefore a difficulty in actively entering the labor market is obvious.

Italian sport psychologists talk about their job

New trends in Sport psychology, special issue of the Italian Journal, Movimento, 3, 2018

17 Italian sport psychologists talk of your job in sport answering at four questions:

  • What motivated you to start the career of sport psychologist?
  • What do you like of this job in SP?
  • Which are the SP areas where you like to work.
  • Describe your current job in PS.
The experts involved are the following:
Giovanna Barazzutti, Emiliano Bernardi, Sara Biondi, Gladys Bounous, Edoardo Ciofi, Cristiana Conti, Sarah Corazzi, Sergio Costa, Sara Landi, Sammy Marcantognini, Stefania Ortensi, Barbara Rossi, Daniela Sepio, Flavia Sferragatta, Matteo Simone, Cecilia Somigli e Graziella Zitelli.

+ wellbeing with 5minutes of movement each work hour

This research showed that it’s better to move 5m each hour of work. The benefits are evident and improve the global wellbeing.

Audrey Bergouignan et al. (2016). Effect of frequent interruptions of prolonged sitting on self-perceived levels of energy, mood, food cravings and cognitive function. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13:113

While physical activity has been shown to improve cognitive performance and well-being, office workers are essentially sedentary. We compared the effects of physical activity performed as (i) one bout in the morning or (ii) as microbouts spread out across the day to (iii) a day spent sitting, on mood and energy levels and cognitive function.

Methods

In a randomized crossover trial, 30 sedentary adults completed each of three conditions: 6 h of uninterrupted sitting (SIT), SIT plus 30 min of moderate-intensity treadmill walking in the morning (ONE), and SIT plus six hourly 5-min microbouts of moderate-intensity treadmill walking (MICRO). Self-perceived energy, mood, and appetite were assessed with visual analog scales. Vigor and fatigue were assessed with the Profile of Mood State questionnaire. Cognitive function was measured using a flanker task and the Comprehensive Trail Making Test. Intervention effects were tested using linear mixed models.

Results

Both ONE and MICRO increased self-perceived energy and vigor compared to SIT (p < 0.05 for all). MICRO, but not ONE, improved mood, decreased levels of fatigue and reduced food cravings at the end of the day compared to SIT (p < 0.05 for all). Cognitive function was not significantly affected by condition.

Conclusions

In addition to the beneficial impact of physical activity on levels of energy and vigor, spreading out physical activity throughout the day improved mood, decreased feelings of fatigue and affected appetite. Introducing short bouts of activity during the workday of sedentary office workers is a promising approach to improve overall well-being at work without negatively impacting cognitive performance.

Carlo Ancelotti’s work philosophy

Carlo Ancelotti is the new coach of Napoli, his goals and how he will work are  already fairly well described in his philosophy of work and which differentiates it significantly from Sarri:

  • Educate the team to pursue victory through a creative and offensive game
  • Encourage the development of a positive work environment
  • Build a strong team spirit by stimulating a large capacity for sacrifice and mutual commitment
  • Support the individual sense of responsibility (assessed on the basis of the actions and behaviors)
  • Protect the tradition and the principles of the club
  • Work to give continuity to the successes of the club
  • Compete for all important trophies
  • Build a clear identity and a style of play which take account of  the club’s tradition
  • Build good relationships between the various work teams
(by Carlo Ancelotti, Il mio albero di Natale)

The culture of mental toughness

The development of mental toughness has often been regarded as a strictly individual factor and we have few information to understand how the sport organizations show and build their culture of toughness and how this promotes the athletes’ toughness .

The article by Eubanks, Nesti e Littlewood (2017), A culturally informed approach to mental toughness development in high performance sport, IJSP, 48, 206-222, revived some new insights about this topic.

The purpose is to explore the importance of culture in the development of Mental Toughness (MT). This is done by means of a critical review of the current literature that exists in relation to the conceptualisation, definition and development of the concept. We argue that despite recent advances in our understanding, most research into MT has focused on the characteristics of mentally tough individuals. Although important and useful, the role of the environment, culture and context, and how these impact MT and its development has been given somewhat less attention and is perhaps not well integrated into practice.

The notion of Mental Toughness (MT) being broadly represented by “the ability to achieve personal goals in the face of pressure from a wide range of different stressors” (Hardy et al., 2014).

One of the criticisms frequently levelled at psychology as an academic discipline is that it often focuses on the individual, and forgets, or ignores the environment within which the individual exists.

Culture may be best seen as the hidden yet influential force, involving core values, beliefs, and traditions that operates as a type of soft power, which shape the working practices, ideas, strategies and philosophies of groups and individuals.

Weinberg et al. (2011) focused on the views of ten National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches, who reported that a tough physical practice environment, a positive men-tal environment and an environment that provided mental toughness awareness and learning opportunities were fundamental to MT development.

The authors said that is clear that the optimum environments to build MT are those that are imbued with a challenging and stimulating culture, where personal responsibility is emphasised in all things.

 

In Italy master in PS don’t help to find work

In Italia la questione della formazione in psicologia dello sport degli psicologi continua a essere un problema non risolto. Tralasciando quelli il cui solo scopo è di fare lavorare i formatori che v’insegnano, anche quelli meglio strutturati hanno notevoli limiti.

Vediamo quali sono a mio avviso:

  1. La quasi totalità propone una formazione centrata a insegnare competenze che dovranno servire per lavorare nell’ambito della prestazione di livello assoluto ed essenzialmente con gli atleti, ignorando la consulenza con gli allenatori o l’organizzazione sportiva. In tal modo molti aspetti del mondo sportivo di alto livello non vengono considerati e i giovani laureati avranno, di conseguenza, difficoltà a interagire con una parte fondamentale (gli allenatori, i dirigenti) dell’ambiente degli atleti.
  2. Due ambiti importanti di lavoro vengono tralasciati nella formazione in psicologia dello sport. Il primo riguarda i programmi di avviamento allo sport (6-12 anni) e l’età dell’adolescenza. Questo ambito, è tra l’altro uno di quelli più facilmente aperti agli psicologi ma in cui è necessario avere delle competenze specifiche mentre quelle riguardanti l’alto livello non sono spendibili se pensiamo all’infanzia e vanno comunque adeguate anche nelle diverse età dell’adolescenza. In queste fasce di età, inoltre, il rapporto con i genitori rappresenta un altro fattore con cui si deve interagire in modo costruttivo. Il secondo ambito importante riguarda, lo sport come diritto di cittadinanza e come fattore di benessere. Anche in questo settore gli psicologi non acquisiscono competenze, se non una generica convinzione che lo sport è un fattore essenziale per la vita di ognuno e della comunità.
  3. Un campo in cui gli psicologi non hanno competenze specifiche riguarda la metodologia dell’allenamento e l’insegnamento sportivo. Com’è possibile interagire con gli allenatori (molti dei quali oggi sono laureati in scienze motorie che hanno sostenuto diversi esami di psicologia) se non si conosce il loro mondo e se non si ha consapevolezza di come s’imparano i gesti sportivi, di cosa sia l’apprendimento motorio o di quale sia l’interazione fra preparazione fisica e psicologia?
  4. Un ulteriore aspetto limitativo dei master odierni è la mancanza di un tirocinio supervisionato per un tempo adeguato (almeno di quattro mesi) presso un’organizzazione sportiva. Ciò che è comune in qualsiasi altro tipo di master, è invece pressoché assente nei master in psicologia dello sport.
  5. Un ultimo aspetto limitante le proposte formative attuali, riguarda l’assenza di come lo psicologo dovrebbe proporsi nell’ambito territoriale e professionale in cui intende svolgere la sua attività. Il tema è quello del marketing di se stessi, essenziale, poiché bisogna sapere come proporsi, come costruire il proprio network professionale, come scrivere un progetto e negoziare un budget, come interagire con i dirigenti di un società sportiva che probabilmente hanno un’idea generica di quali servizi lo psicologo dello sport potrebbe offrire.
A mio avviso, la mancanza di questi ambiti formativi riduce notevolmente le opportunità di promozione e diffusione di questo ambito lavorativo, lasciando lo psicologo in una condizione di minorità rispetto alle altre professionalità che da tempo operano in modo consolidato nello sport.

Happiness

“Happiness does not come automatically. It is not a gift that good fortune bestows upon us and a reversal of fortune takes back. It depends on us alone. One does not become happy overnight, but with patient labor, day after day. Happiness is constructed, and that requires effort and time. In order to become happy, we have to learn how to change ourselves.”

Luca & Francesco Cavalli-Sforza

 

Be creative needs a lot of work

Today an interesting article by Carlo Rovelli published on laRepubblica talks about the scientific creativity. He says that comes from the total immersion in the current knowledge. “To get it intensely, to live immersed in it.” Being into the problems until you find the door that nobody noticed until that moment, and open a door toward a new knowledge. In other words, new ideas come only to those who have worked very hard. It’s the claim that the Nobel prize Subrahhmanyan Chandrasekhar expresses to Rovelli during a dinner: “To do good physics is not necessary to be particularly intelligent. What it needs it’s a lot of work.”

It’s strange, says Carlo Rovelli in another article- but perhaps the most beautiful description of how science works, and its a long time, has given Plato, in his “seventh” letter, sent to Dione family in Syracuse, when he describes the activity of the true “seeker of truth”: “After much effort, when names, definitions, comments and other sensitive data, are brought into contact with the bottom and compared with each other, in the course of scrutiny and a friendly but stern examination done by men who proceed by questions and answers, and no ulterior motives, at the end with a sudden flash shines, for any problem, understanding, and clarity of intelligence, the effects of which, express the extreme limits of human power.”

The same think Alain Connes, mathematician, always reported by Rovelli in his article: “You study, study, study again, then one day, studying, there is a strange feeling: « but not, it cannot be so, here there is something else again.» “From that moment, you’re a scientist.”

Each of us should reflect on these words from Plato to today are repeated with conviction, wondering if sometimes our disappointments and our results below the expectations not derive simply from not be very well prepared.

Stress job related is growing in Europe

Performance anxiety , agitation, nervousness are sensations that affect 40 % of Italians in the workplace. Problems that arise from stress, the second among the work-related health problems. Stress due to the competition, to the fast-paced, fear of making a mistake and for the many precarious even the fear of losing their jobs. In the European Union, the work-related stress affects nearly one in four people and costs 25 billion euros, in part because more than half of lost working days are caused by stress

For seven out of ten Italian workers the most common causes of stress are related to the job reorganization or the workload and working hours. Alarming figures coming out from a study of the national council of the psychologist roster, published in the book Risk work-related stress.

It is apparent that more than six out of ten Italian workers indicate one of the causes of stress also the lack of support from colleagues or superiors and unacceptable behavior such as bullying, harassment or at unclear roles and responsibilities.

Among the groups most at risk are nurses, staff call centers or offices complaint employees, drivers. “Adopting the right approach – says Giuseppe Luigi Palma , president of the national council of psychologists – the workers and the companies can win the battle against stress, is preventable and shared actions can be very effective.” The book presents a large risk of work-related stress cases. Nearly half of workers in Europe (51 %) believe that work-related stress is common in the workplace . Women workers are more likely to consider a common phenomenon (54 % vs. 49%). The perception of work stress also varies depending on the sector, the first sector to indicate cases of work-related stress as a common phenomenon is that health community  (61% , including 21 % who felt that such cases are ” very common ” ) .