Archive for the 'Stress' Category

How to manage the subjective habits

The main subjective interferences that a coach can commit when evaluating his or her athlete or team.

  1. Stereotypes. Stereotypes are group prejudices that tend to reinforce specific characteristics of the group: “Italian teams play well only at home, while abroad they suffer their opponents.”
  2. Influence of personal feelings. Sympathy and dislike are variables that must be controlled by the coach: “When that player asks me something I never know how to say no to him.”
  3. Personal equation. Tendency to evaluate others in the way we evaluate ourselves, and consequent tendency to positively examine those who have the same characteristics as us and negatively those who have different characteristics: “I see myself in him as a young man”.
  4. First impression. “First impression is what counts” is a phrase that is often said: It’s useless, from the first time I didn’t like it.
  5. Halo effect. It consists in attributing a value to an individual on the basis of a single criterion or a single competence: “He cares so much about what he does, I didn’t expect him to make these mistakes.”
  6. Contrast effect. When in a team or in a sports group made up of mid-level athletes, a young person arrives even slightly higher level, his evaluation risks becoming excessively positive and reducing the cohesion of the group: “That boy is definitely superior, he is wasted on us; for the skills he shows he should play at another level.

Greetings at Chris Froome

Greetings at Chris Froome. He will get back to the race the next month for UAE Tour, after the terrific accidents last year.

Jurgen Klopp’s 10 rules for success

Jurgen Klopp’s 10 rules of success.

  1. Improve your environment - We only have one life and we must do everything we can to make it the best possible. Make people enjoy meeting you for what you are doing to improve their environment.
  2. Build memorable experiences - Play unforgettable games, be curious and eager to play the next game to see what will happen, and that’s what football should be. If you take this attitude, you will be 100% successful.
  3. Live in the moment - if you live in the future, forget that you can change it significantly. If you live in the past, however, it can be good to relive your best moments. But we are in the middle of our lives and if we want to do something for our family and for others we have to be 100% in the present.
  4. Building a family - we are not alone in the world, we must be a group. To succeed, we have to be together with the team and the fans.
  5. Be confident - you have to learn how to deal with hard times and defeats. The most important thing about football is that you are responsible for everyone, so you have to be confident to arrive at the moment when you are ready. It’s always difficult from day one and you take it one step at a time.
  6. Keep trying - when you win it’s great and when you lose it doesn’t mean you’re incapable, you have to be convinced that what matters is to keep trying even if you don’t know how long it will take you to succeed.
  7. Learn from your experience - you don’t have to live in the past but life is so fast that you have to learn to use your own experience or that of other people to avoid the same mistakes.
  8. Be disciplined - Never abandon your goals, always stay focused. Certainly teaching this to young footballers is difficult. It’s much more than believing in it, because you can believe in something but also easily lose that belief, that’s why it’s more important to feel strong in difficult times.
  9. Being passionate - You have to use tactics with your heart. You have to live the game intensely, otherwise it’s boring.
  10. Express energy - Most of the time I’m not an emotional person, but during the game something strange happens and if I saw myself from the outside I’d say: “Are you crazy?”

English football promotes the mental health

English football moves to promote a national campaign to promote mental health.

(L to R) Jesse Lingard, Harry Maguire and Jordan Pickford

In the stadiums, before the game there will be showed a video in which Frank Lampard, Chelsea’s manager, will admit that his family “stored a lot of emotions, feelings and sometimes anxiety”, and his former teammate Joe Cole will describe how he practiced yoga when he felt anxious, “centering himself and getting back to the zone.”

Many footballers have developed a desire to help others like Tottenham’s Dele Alli: “There are so many people struggling with their mental health, so I want to help people understand that they don’t have to face it alone.”

Team supporters in particular are mostly men, around 15 million, who with great difficulty admit they have mental problems and usually are not committed to dealing with them. The message of the players easily will reach a very large audience and will be of great help because it comes from other men, who are part of the teams whose fans they are.

Similar statements come from managers like Slaven Bilić, West Bromwich Albion, who said that without a good mental condition he would not be able to transmit energy and ideas to his players. And Rosella Ayane, a Tottenham player, explains: “Turning off your mobile phone, Twitter and Instagram allows you to live fully your time  and only in this way you make a big difference.”

How to manage the momentum according Maria Sharapova e Serena Williams

Some rules to achieve the excellence from two top tennis players.

Maria Sharapova

When you are in a competitive situation and you’re down, what do you do or say to yourself?
“I take my time in between in my service games. I walk to the baseline. I move my strings around. I do a little pep talk, and it’s very automatic. I think it’s more of putting my eyes onto my strings and having this repetition that it doesn’t matter if I won the point or lost the point. I’m on this this river that is going to get to where it’s going no matter what rock is in the way, no matter what storm is on the way. The water is, ultimately, going to go down the river. It’s a safe place for me because in tennis momentum changes so much, just like in life. One second, everything is positive, and you get bad news. You go from a great day to wow. I see those strings, and I see my fingers playing with those strings, and I think of being level headed and being not overly excited, not down. But being in this medium frame of mind.”

Serena Williams

My game is my mental toughness - “Just not only to be able to play, to win, but to be able to come back when I’m down. Both on the court and after tough losses, just to continue to come back and continue to fight, it’s something that takes a lot of tenacity.”

Practice under pressure -  Williams believes tennis is “70 percent mental,”, for this reason she tries to replicate match situations during the sessions. For instance: down 15 to 30 on her second serve. Competitive simulation is a  very efficient coaching method. P

Stay in the moment - many tennis players choke under pressure and tend to unravel when they are behind. It’s important stay there, using our mental strength to win. You reach this goal living the moment: “Even if you’re going through something in life, you can’t rush through it instantly. Take it one moment at a time. It’s the same on a tennis court. You have to take it one point at a time.” Live the here and now.

Forget the mistakes - “Another thing that makes me play poorly is if I’m thinking too much about my last match. I might have won it, but not happy with how I won it,” says Williams. “If you get really upset at mistakes, the best advice I’ve ever been given is to forget about it. You can’t rewind time, you can’t take back that mistake, but you can make it better and not do it in the future.”

 

 

The table tennis winning mindset

Born in Huangshi City in China; 54 year old Chen Bin is the personal coach of Ding Ning,  Olympic and World champion. Here are his main rules to be a winning tabe tennis player.

Learn from the mistakes - Ding Ning was beaten by Feng Tianwei in the contest that witnessed a three-one win for Singapore. Consistently, Ding Ning has stated the defeat in Moscow was a major reason why she became World champion in Rotterdam the following year.

Toughness - “It’s definitely her perseverance, her stable performance and she’s also very bold in trying out new skills & techniques”, stressed Chen Bin.

“The level of the players differs a lot, the Asian and the European teams are stronger, while African and Oceania team are weaker. The main difference lies on the players’ understanding of the sport and the ball itself, the weaker players know how to play, but they don’t know how to play it well, table tennis is not just about hitting the ball back on the table, you have to return the ball back, you have to have a feel of how the ball is coming towards you, and visualize how your ball is going to end up on your opponent’s table when you hit it back.”

Pre-match preparation - “I gave them a talk on pre-match preparations, which I think is an important part of competition”, said Chen Bin. “Before a match, the coach and the player have to be well prepared, anything can happen; the players must know how to deal with different situations that could happen. You must think of “Plan B” or “Plan C” to help your athlete to be mentally prepared for all kinds of scenarios and difficulties on court.”

Mindset - There is more than technical preparation prior to a match.

“Mind set is vital, the pre-match preparations and the players’ mentality in different situations on court. the European players, they have good physique and good strength, but they don’t know how to release that power in their play.”

Interview With Chen Bin – Coaches Grow Together With Their Players

To change?

If the only permanent thing in life is change, we must become not too attached to our habits, which we should first abandon.

Olympic medallist mental skills

One often asks oneself which are the mental characteristics of champions and imagines that they have special personalities. That’s not true.

The data below shows that they are essential skills that anyone could train and perfect. The question is that few are willing to train following these goals, which require a daily expenditure of energy and willingness to work for not only athletic and technical-tactical goals but also for psychological goals.

Be aware of our strength points

One difficulty of the athletes, and to a greater extent the younger ones, is related to talking about their strengths, while they are much more focused on talking about their mistakes.

Certainly it is not wrong to be aware of the mistakes and to be focused to overcoming them with training.

The opposite is valid in competition. It’s more useful to focus on what to do to compete at the best and this only happens by putting the best skills in action.

Athletes often say: “I’m very focused on improving myself and I think little about what I’m able to do.”

The objective should be twofold: to train to improve but also to be aware of our skills (physical, technical-tactical and mental).

For example, we can start from the performance goals and stimulate athletes to identify the skills they need to achieve them, in other words, stimulate them to reflect and write down what their strengths are, what they do when competing at their best, so as to put in their mental desktop the skills to use in the race and especially those that want to use more when they are under pressure.

Change your sport career with the mental coaching

Still 200 days to prepare yourself mentally for the next Olympics, a period of 6 months of mental training could optimize your psychological strengths to successfully face the Olympic challenge.

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