Tag Archive for 'motivazione'

The team rigid mindset is the reason for the defeats

The most serious problem for a team and athletes is to think they are good.

This belief immediately puts people in a condition of greater satisfaction and fuels the expectation that everything will go well as they expect, so we will win.

Feeling fit and being aware of your personal and team skills is certainly important. Often teams think that this condition is enough to achieve success. They don’t understand that it is necessary but not enough.

To play at a high level, you have to have the skills of a high level team. Then you have to prove it on the pitch.

Arrigo Sacchi says that the motivation must be exceptional, because on this basis the player is constantly striving to improve himself. That’s what Carol Dweck has called a growth-mindset. Those who don’t demonstrate it are destined to have what the coaches say: a mental block. In other words, these players have a rigid mentality that leads them to think that their talent and fitness are enough to be effective in their work.

Serious mistake. They will strategie the match without the motivation to play at the best. They will enter with the conviction that they will play well so spontaneously, and when faced with the difficulties of the match they will not be ready to adapt, because they hadn’t foreseen it.

Motivation? Ballet barefoot on concrete while raining.

One of the most shared videos in the last few days features a boy from the Leap of Dance Academy, a Nigerian dance school. In the video we see him continuing to practice his pirouettes despite the incessant rain.

Barefoot and completely wet, his obstinacy has become a symbol of how much a dancer can sacrifice to follow his dream. “Behind those fanciful and elegant costumes there is hard work” – reads the caption of the video – “Even with very few resources our students continue to train to give the best. We don’t want to discourage anyone, but it is important to show the level of their commitment and dedication. Who wouldn’t be proud? They are ready to dance under any conditions”.Si allena scalzo sotto la pioggia: questo giovanissimo ballerino ha conquistato tutti

Motivation and training during coronavirus pandemic

Today online seminar at the University on current topics on the psychological aspects of training in the corona virus period.

Be aware of your motivation

We often talk about athletes’ motivation but not always with the same frequency we teach how to understand their personal motivation.

I want to propose two useful exercises to reflect on this point in a constructive way.

First exercise

Sit comfortably in a chair, close your eyes, take three deep breaths and think about the difficult moments you encounter during training and racing, the fatigue, mistakes and defeats experienced, and assess whether you’re willing to face other difficult moments and be committed to overcoming them.

Second exercise

Sit comfortably in a chair, close your eyes, take three deep breaths and think about the successes you can achieve and the races you can win, the joy you can feel after a brilliant performance and all the positive things that can happen thanks to the quantity and quality of your training. Evaluate whether they are enough to keep your motivation high.

New Zealand: one project to change the youth sport approach

Youth sport, the need for multi-sports practice, the drop-out causes, the increase in injuries and the parents, coaches and managers role. These are the themes of one project developed in New Zealand to reconsider the approaches used up to day. It is an approach not used in Italy but I suppose that is the same in many others European countries. We need to be more responsible of the sports proposal we offer to our children and adolescents. We need to reduce sport drop-out  in order to promote their well-being, sense of belonging and good life habits.

Reading the following article will certainly be useful to open our minds to the problem of sports practice and drop-out and to receive good insights..

Sport NZ and five of the largest participation sports in New Zealand – Rugby, Cricket, Football, Netball and Hockey – have launched a major public awareness campaign calling for enablers of youth sport to reconsider their approaches. But why is the call to action so urgent?

The collaborative ‘Keep up with the play’ campaign zeroes in on the issue of why teens are walking away from sport in increasing numbers. Evidence gathered over time in Sport NZ’s Active NZ national participation survey shows that when comparing 12-14 year olds with 18-24 year olds, hours per week engaged in physical activity drops from 12 to 5. In addition, the number of activities drops from 6.4 to 2.5 and weekly participation drops substantively from 98% to 75%. The campaign calls on everyone involved in youth sport, specifically parents, coaches and administrators, to help turn this around.

Furthermore, Secondary School Sport census data shows that although school rolls have increased over the last three years, participation has dropped in inter-school sport. For Sport NZ this is disturbing, because habits formed in the teen years transfer to the adult years. Basically inactive teens become inactive adults.

Although some of the drop-off can be attributed to the inevitable changes that occur during the teen years including motivation, contention on time and the impact of technology, there are other factors that exacerbate this decline.

Sport NZ says that years spent studying the subject, and examining overseas models, shows young people are best served when their needs are put first. And the main motivation for young people to play sport is to have fun (76%) followed by hanging out with family or friends (44%). The fact is that sport is seen by many teens as another way to connect with friends and have a good time. And if the fun goes, because the pressure and time demands rachet up, they’ll be likely to follow.

Though some parents might be tempted to let their kids specialise early in one sport, perhaps encouraged by a coach or club administrator, the statistics show this is probably a bad idea. Australian studies demonstrate that the transition rate from being identified as youth talent to becoming an elite athlete is less than 10%.

And it won’t necessarily be worth it. Over training and over playing can lead to injury and burn out in young players. ACC statistics have shown a 60% surge since 2008 in sports-related injuries in 10-14 year olds – double the increase of any other age group. There are a number of reasons for the spike, but a growing concern is that too much of one sport can be just as harmful as not enough exercise.

For those looking for a helpful guide, ACC encourages the one hour for every year guideline, where the amount of organised sport per week – both training and competition – should not exceed the child’s age. Exceeding recommended hours increases the odds of a ‘gradual onset injury’.

All in all, the stats are sobering. And though every parent wants to support their child becoming a star on the sports field, too much too soon may have just the opposite effect.”

Motivation: a beautiful word, understood by few people

Do people who every day talk easily about motivation, explaining to others that it is enough to believe in it, to see their dreams come true, know how much is a very complex psychological dimension to manage?

 

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All things originate in the mind

All things originate in the mind. Actions and events depend heavily on motivation. Appreciation of humanity, compassion and love are key points. If we develop a good heart, whether our field is science, agriculture or politics, since motivation is so crucial, they’ll all improve.

Dalai Lama

Provide feedback about commitment is a key point to learn

During the training to provide continuous feedback about commitment is a key point to enhance learning. Athletes should be aware about the commitment level they must show during exercises of every training session. The reasons why one should not engage just enough are as follows:

  • promotes technical errors
  • leads to a reduced focus on the task
  • reduces intrinsic motivation
  • obliges the coach to provide the same technical instructions, because the athletes often repeat the same mistakes and improve slowly
  • builds the habit to consider improving as something very hard to get
It is the responsibility of the coach:
  1. stimulate the commitment continuously
  2. accept that athletes just because they undertake with great intensity can commit more technical errors
  3. recognize first the commitment and secondly the technical aspects
  4. stimulate in athletes that the improvement comes by personal commitment
  5. teach be aware that the individual technical and motors limits can be discovered only by training with intensity and motivation
  6. teach to be satisfied of the personal commitment, although it not always determines the quality of performance
  7. teach be aware that the quality of performance is related to the commitment and it takes more than talent to be good athletes
  8. teach, in team sports, the intensity is a collective resource that no one should ignore and everyone should encourage the mates
  9. point out even before technical errors any lack of commitment
  10. explain what are the behaviors that show athletes who train with intensity and that we want to watch in our group

Master athletes in track and field

The phenomenon related to adult and aged people’s practice is more and more increasing, specially in long distance running, but also in the various  track disciplines. A study was carried out on track and field masters, taking part at the Italian Master Championships with the aim of studying motivation, using the self-determination theory, pointing out relations between the psychological dimensions, the different age categories and the characteristics of sport career. Another goal was aimed at identifying a series of information on their sport career, such as the “sport life” and the kind of activity during their practice.

The data about the characteristics of the practice are the following:

  • 55% has been track and field young athlete, while the 40% has practiced athletics
  • 47% started this sport less than two years ago, 27,5% since 2/3 years and 15% since more that 15 years
  • 82,5% practice all the year, while 12,5% only sometimes
  • 46,3% train 3/4 times per week, while 28,8% more often
  • 51,3% train alone, while 35,3% in group and 7,5% both
  • 80% train in a track field
  • 42,5% is without a coach, while 51,3% with a coach
  • 60% don’t train in also in the gym, while 35% in a gym too

(Carbonaro, Cei, Ruscello and Quagliarotti, Atletica Studi, 2016, 3/4, 28-40)