Archive for the 'Tiro a volo' Category

Eliud Kipchoge moves human limits forward

If the marathon is a metaphor for life; Eliud Kipchoge’s performance is the demonstration that the limits are a cultural expression that can be overcome with work.

You have to lead a life adequate to the goals you want to achieve and what you want to succeed.

Some people argue that unexpected events can prevent this from happening. That is true, but you have to commit yourself every day as if it could not happen.

Excellence does not require two lose the private life, which instead must find a place within the project.

It is said that “if you don’t dream big, you’re not realistic”, we have to teach it to young people.

You have to want everything, knowing that only by working hard and at best you could get it, but nothing and no one can ever guarantee this satisfaction: you have to run the risk of failure having given everything.

Make mistakes is a part of the game

Losing is a part of the game in which athletes are involved. Everyone knows it, few people accept it. They close out in shame of not having been able to win a race, to avoid coldly assessing what they will have to do in the next race.

Losing is seen as a wound at ourself: “It means that despite training, I cannot do what I know to do. In this way, the athletes don’t develop self-confidence and this explanation of defeat continues to weigh in the next race. The mind is not free, it is not focused on the present but it is taken to see what will happen this time: “Will I be able to do what I know to do or will I fall back into the same mistakes?”

A vicious circle is established limiting the athletes and the performances, because this negative attitude does not allow them to stay focused on the task, waiting for the catastrophe that at some point will come.

Then the justifications: I was tired, I did not sleep well, I felt the burden of responsibility, everyone expects I perform at my best, “Yes, I could … But it’s difficult… in those moments I don’t react”.

There is a well-established mindset to find alibi for the negative performance and there is no humility in saying: “Ok, I’ve got this and that wrong. Well, next time I want to commit myself to finding solutions to these difficulties.”

Competitions are not a health walk. For athletes the races are extreme tests and those who are most able to deal with the difficulties that the extreme situation offers usually win.

We as sports psychologists can play an important role in determining this awareness and teaching positive ways of living these extreme situations. It is not a problem to make mistakes. It is a physiological fact, because the one who makes the least mistakes wins. Making mistakes is part of the race, even those who win make mistakes. They probably make fewer mistakes and are less influenced by their mistakes.

We chill do mistakes: only those who are presumptuous can think differently. We make one mistake and the next minute we think: “I’ll correct myself in this way.”

How many times do you have to do this? I don’t know, it depends on the duration of the race but one thing is certain:

“It doesn’t matter how many times you fall, but how quickly you get up.

 

Athletes’ 10 more common mistakes

List of the most common mistakes made by athletes starting from their sentences.

  1. the technique solves any difficult situation
  2. I just have to train for many hours and if that’s not enough, I’ll add more hours
  3. it’s always important to do what the coach says
  4. I did everything I had to do to be ready, now let’s see how it goes
  5. the opponent was too strong
  6. I don’t believe that I continue to make the same mistakes
  7. after a while I lose my mind
  8. today wasn’t exactly a good day, I knew it would has been bad
  9. when I make a stupid mistake, I get mad at myself and I make another one.
  10. It was all right until then, but then it was a disaster.

4 lessons life from Roger Federer

A lesson for all the athletes who want excel in their career!

Risultati immagini per 4 life lessons from roger federer

10 good reasons to take a deep breath

10 good reasons to learn to take a deep breath

  1. improves self-control in stress situations
  2. improves the management of physical and mental fatigue
  3. first action to take when you want to relax
  4. precedes the visualization of a technical or competition action
  5. reduces the mental tension and stimulates effective thoughts
  6. promotes muscle stretching during this phase of training
  7. reduces impulsive verbal responses
  8. facilitates immediate recovery after a high intensity exercise
  9. further deepens the focus on the task
  10. reduces pre-race or competitive activation if it’s the case

The warm-up is for the body and mind

In relation to warming up, I would like to take up what Jurgen Weineck said in his book “The optimal training” because it is a text known to all coaches (psychologists should study it). In fact, it clearly illustrates the physical and also mental role of this phase of training. It thus highlights how important it is to teach young athletes to use this phase of training in the right way and not simply as boring exercises to be carried out to avoid injury.

“Warm-up means all the measures that, before a sporting load – whether for training or competition – useful both to create a state of optimal coordination of psychophysical and kinesthetic preparation and to prevent accidents.

“In active warming up, the athlete practically performs the exercises or movements, while in mental warming he only represents them… If it is used alone … mental training is of little use, because it only partially sets in motion, and often with little intensity, the adaptation processes characteristic of warm-up. However, in some sports (e.g. artistic gymnastics and athletic) it is very effective when combined with other warm-upmethods” (p. 547).

“As can be seen from various works there are interrelationships between warming up, motivation and the psychic attitude towards the activity itself. Thus, on the one hand, a high degree of motivation and a strongly performance-oriented attitude can strengthen the effectiveness of warming – among other things, thanks to the psychic parameters of the pre-event state that prepares the body for a high performance – while, on the other hand, a negative attitude towards it reduces or totally eliminates the benefits … warming up, starting from an initial “neutral” situation, serves to form a psychic state of readiness to perform, evokes an optimal state of excitement of the nervous system, thus improving the attitude towards sports performance and concentration on it” (p.551).

Courses to understand the athlete development

Long Term Athlete Development promotes sport professional culture and science in sport experts (coach, psychologist, physician, manager).

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The main topics of the next blog

After the summer break in writing to regenerate ideas, these are the main themes that I would like to present in the next blogs.

  1. Long-career athletes, how to continue to manage the stress of the need to win
  2. Reduce your psychological and daily life needs to the minimum necessary
  3. Call it what you want, meditation, mindfulness or concentration but train your mind daily
  4. Understand that warm-up is an opportunity for mental training
  5. The team atmosphere is decisive for providing exceptional performance
  6. Every single exercise is an expression of the physical, mental and technical condition of the athlete.
  7. Learning psychological techniques is only a small part of mental training
  8. “I do it because I like it” is the basis of every workout
  9. You must learn to accept stress and fatigue as you accept the seasons
  10. Convincing yourself that you have to do mistakes to be able to improve

Book review: Handbook of Embodied Cognition and Sport Psychology

Handbook of Embodied Cognition and Sport Psychology 

Massimiliano L. Cappuccio (Ed.)

Cambridge, MIT Press, 2018

This landmark work is the first systematic collaboration between cognitive scientists and sports psychologists that considers the mind–body relationship from the perspective of athletic skill and sports practice. With twenty-six chapters by leading researchers, the book connects and integrates findings from fields that range from philosophy of mind to sociology of sports.

The chapters show not only that sports can tell scientists how the human mind works but also that the scientific study of the human mind can help athletes succeed. Sports psychology research has always focused on the themes, notions, and models of embodied cognition; embodied cognition, in turn, has found striking confirmation of its theoretical claims in the psychological accounts of sports performance and athletic skill. Athletic skill is a legitimate form of intelligence, involving cognitive faculties no less sophisticated and complex than those required by mathematical problem solving.

After presenting the key concepts necessary for applying embodied cognition to sports psychology, the book discusses skill disruption (the tendency to “choke” under pressure); sensorimotor skill acquisition and how training correlates to the development of cognitive faculties; the intersubjective and social dimension of sports skills, seen in team sports; sports practice in cultural and societal contexts; the notion of “affordance” and its significance for ecological psychology and embodied cognition theory; and the mind’s predictive capabilities, which enable anticipation, creativity, improvisation, and imagination in sports performance.

Contributors
Ana Maria Abreu, Kenneth Aggerholm, Salvatore Maria Aglioti, Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza, Duarte Araújo, Jürgen Beckmann, Kath Bicknell, Geoffrey P. Bingham, Jens E. Birch, Gunnar Breivik, Noel E. Brick, Massimiliano L. Cappuccio, Thomas H. Carr, Alberto Cei, Anthony Chemero, Wayne Christensen, Lincoln J. Colling, Cassie Comley, Keith Davids, Matt Dicks, Caren Diehl, Karl Erickson, Anna Esposito, Pedro Tiago Esteves, Mirko Farina, Giolo Fele, Denis Francesconi, Shaun Gallagher, Gowrishankar Ganesh, Raúl Sánchez-García, Rob Gray, Denise M. Hill, Daniel D. Hutto, Tsuyoshi Ikegami, Geir Jordet, Adam Kiefer, Michael Kirchhoff, Kevin Krein, Kenneth Liberman, Tadhg E. MacIntyre, Nelson Mauro Maldonato, David L. Mann, Richard S. W. Masters, Patrick McGivern, Doris McIlwain, Michele Merritt, Christopher Mesagno, Vegard Fusche Moe, Barbara Gail Montero, Aidan P. Moran, David Moreau, Hiroki Nakamoto, Alberto Oliverio, David Papineau, Gert-Jan Pepping, Miriam Reiner, Ian Renshaw, Michael A. Riley, Zuzanna Rucinska, Lawrence Shapiro, Paula Silva, Shannon Spaulding, John Sutton, Phillip D. Tomporowski, John Toner, Andrew D. Wilson, Audrey Yap, Qin Zhu, Christopher Madan.

Best mindset = More successes

G Sathiyan, top tennis table player, India, the rise of the new winning mindset

“Tragedy struck in November, 2015. While his game was flourishing, albeit at a slow pace, Sathiyan’s father left for the heavenly abode after losing his fight with cancer. His world came crashing down. His entire family was devastated. “The main thought that came in my mind was how could someone who led his life in such a disciplined manner (no smoking and drinking) be taken away under such cruel circumstances.”

Then started his paradigm shift. His gameplay involved ca­lculative moves and playing it sa­fe. In life also, he was averse to ch­ange and always adopted a safet­y-first approach, something he le­a­rnt from his father. But not any more.
“There was a total mindset change, not only towards my game but also in my daily life. I started taking more risks. My father’s death changed me as a person. I was always worried about the future. I was a person who was always calculative: what is going to come next, and if I do this, what will happen next.
“But I felt like when there’s no guarantee as to what’s going to happen tomorrow, what’s the point in calculating so much? If there is no guarantee for life, where is the guarantee for what is going to happen in sport?”
The diminutive paddler’s new nothing-to-lose attitude started pa­ying immediate dividends. He became the second Indian to win a ITTF World Tour event after annexing the 2016 Belgium Open.

Singapore Team, table tennis, the rise of a new winning mindset

It was an epic moment in the history of table tennis, the day when underdogs Singapore toppled mighty China to win the women’s team crown at the 2010 World Championships. It was almost unfathomable. How could Singapore, a tiny nation of five million people, upset China, the giants ofworld table tennis with its population of 1.35 billion?

“A lot of times, when we met them in the finals we lost 3-0, 3-1, but we kepttelling the Singapore players that one day we would beat them …. So, during the training, we kept drilling this into them – to have this mindset that we’re able to beat them …Tianwei was trailing in the first match but she was fighting for every point … when she won the match, it really gave a lot of confidence to Yuegu going into the second match.She had never beaten that China girl before … but suddenly they felt that the past doesn’t count, that although we have lost so many, many matches, it’s like a fresh start.”