Archive for the 'Tiro a volo' Category

Self-explanation is a relevant learning technique

It is better to ask a student to see if they can explain something to themselves, than for a teacher or book to always explain it to them. That’s according to a new meta-analysis of the findings from 64 prior studies involving nearly 6000 participants that compared learning outcomes from prompted self-explanation compared to instructor explanation, or compared to time spent using other study techniques such as taking notes, summarising, thinking out loud (without the reflection and elaboration involved in self-explanation), or solving more problems.

“It has often been observed that students learn steps in a procedure without understanding how each step relates to others or contributes to the goal of the procedure … Consequently, learners are less able to transfer the procedure to tasks with differing conditions.”

“…more successful learners tended to self-explain either by predicting the next step in a problem solution (anticipative reasoning) or identifying the overall goal structure of the problem and the purpose of its subgoals (principle-based explaining).”

In tennis, it means that one player with adequate skills to play a match makes errors because he or she is not able to elaborate the anticipative reasoning to use his/her skills in a specific match situation or doesn’t understand the next shot is a sub-goal of the main goal that is the game management. Therefore, the player need to integrate the tennis competences into a personal learning system to fulfill the match requests and self-explanation become a successful learning technique to develop the anticipative strategy.

Bisra, K., Liu, Q., Nesbit, J.C., Salimi, F., e Winne, P.H. (2018). Inducing self-explanation: A meta-analysis. Educational Psychology Review, 30, 703-725.

Maureen Weiss #youth #development #experts

40 years ago Maureen Weiss  has been one of the founder of the research focused on sport and physical activity as a context for promoting youths’ physical, social, and psychological development. She writes: “My work takes a developmental theoretical perspective, by considering youths’ cognitive, social, emotional, and physical abilities in describing and explaining variations in behavior related to motivation, self-perceptions, social relationships, moral development, and observational learning.”

Since 2009, Weiss’s most fulfilling work has been with Girls on the Run, a physical activity, positive youth development program designed to enhance girls’ social, emotional, and physical development using running as a vehicle.

She attended at ISYS 40th Anniversary and provided some excellent suggestions to young who want to become experts in a specific area of interest.

How to live the worst performances

I want to propose again this blog. The reason is that is so important to react constructively to the bad results. it’s not an easy condition for every athletes, but if you want to improve you need to learn how to live these moments. One again the experience of great champion, like Tiger Woods, leads to find this difficult solution. It is very useful for the young athletes too.

If you are a champion you do figure out how to address the losses and Tiger Woods definitely  is.

One day after the worst score of his career, Tiger Woods played the final round of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide just like it was any other Sunday. He wore his red shirt. He played at the same pace. He tossed blades of grass in the air to judge the wind and crouched to read important putts. The only difference was he played as a single. He even removed a flagstick by himself when his caddie was busy raking a bunker.

“Just because I’m in last place doesn’t change how I play golf,” he said. “Whether it’s the first day or last day, doesn’t matter. Play all out.”

This is a lonely sport,” Woods said. “The manager is not going to come in and bring the righty or bring the lefty. You’ve just got to play through it. And that’s one of the hardest things about the game of golf, and it’s also one of the best things about the game of golf. When you’re on, no one is going to slow you down. When you’re off, no one is going to pick you up, either. It’s one of those sports that’s tough. Deal with it.

Italy: + poor + cars – sports

From: The return of regional inequality, J. Rosés and N. Wolf

“A recent literature has explored growing personal wealth inequality in countries around the world. This column explores the widening wealth gap between regions and across states in Europe. This rise in regional inequality, combined with rising personal inequality, has played a significant role in the recent populist backlash.

Growing inequality in terms of personal income and wealth distribution is a major concern, as shown by the work of Atkinson (2007), Piketty (2014), and Milanovich (2016). Their work suggests that the post-war period, with high income growth spreading to all parts of society in OECD countries, was a historical exception rather than a guide to the global future. It all ended in the 1980s, with a sharp increase in top incomes, stagnating middle income, and a real decline for the poor.

There is growing evidence that this applies not only to inequality between people, with a widening gap between a few very rich individuals and all others, but also to regional differences within and across states. Rodriguez-Pose (2018) argued that regions across the world seeing declines are those that breed political tension and rising populism, for example in the US, the UK, France, Germany, and elsewhere.”

In Italy, a study published by Save the Children showed the same trend:

  • 10 millions of young and 37 millions of cars
  • +50% of adolescents do not practice sports
  • 259.000% (11%) young of 14 biggest city live in suburb areas with urbanist, educational and social problems
  • Roma and Genova: live in these areas the 70% of the youngest
  • Napoli and Palermo: 60%
  • Milano: 43%
  • Cagliari: 35%
  • 25% of the young live in apartment not adequate
  • poor education: in 2013, 3 millions and 200.000 of young between 6-17 (47.9%) had not read a book, outside of the school books
In Italy,  the investments in the public school system have been reduced from 4.6% to 3.9%, whereas in France and Germany they have been increased till 5% of GDP.

 

10 questions to become a great coach

10 rules to become a successful coach by John Salmela (1945-2014).

  1. Strive to acquire and implement new tactics and strategies
  2. Maturing as a coach takes time. Be patient and honest with yourself
  3. Just because something worked three years ago does not mean it will work today. Constantly evaluate and adjust your approaches and strategies
  4. Hard work is important and must become an accepted way of life
  5. If you want to excel, be prepared to devote more hours than you originally thought necessary
  6. Find a coaching style that suits your personally and brings the best out in you
  7. Respect is not given, but shared. If you respect your athletes, they will respect you in return
  8. Create en environment that is educational, fun and challenging your athletes
  9. Learn to communicate your thought and beliefs to your athletes
  10. Understand that as a coach, the final decision rests in your hands

Baseball fundamentals

Baseball fundamentals for Ken Ravizza (1948-2018), a master of mental coaching.

10 questions to understand the coaching effectiveness

10 questions for athletes and coaches. How much my coaching is oriented to teach:
  1. athlete controls the process of his/her performance (e.g. technique, timing, speed and accuracy) and much more less the result
  2. what happens before determines what happens immediately after (e.g. warm-up quality determina to be ready to start training)
  3. mistake is a coaching component, the improvement occurs through the prompt reaction at this situation
  4. high intensity and concentration must be showed during all the coaching time
  5. athlete must be mentally ready to do and not only to start one exercise just to do
  6. athlete must be aware of his/her thoughts, feelings and behaviors
  7. coaching is not a sequence of exercises but it is a sequence of situations to be solved in the best way
  8. coach/athlete dialogue is a fundamental aspect of the coach and athlete improvement
  9. before to start one exercise it’s necessary to be committed for some moments to visualize the task to do
  10. behavioral routine are essentials to execute difficult tasks and to cope with competitive situations

1893 #blog 9 years

The blog is a way, for me, to spread ideas and information related to the context in which a professional works. In this case, it is psychology, sport, movement, wellbeing, coaches, parents and young people. Each blog is a brief tale of something that has influenced me, and it describes a different way to stay in the sport daily life.

I write the blog with the goal to look for everyday situations starting from their small expressions. It’s a kind of thinking aloud concerning responses to what has just happened, with the awareness of being disconfirmed from what it may happen in the near future.

 

 

The coach job

Talk, share, ask, understand, lead, look … this is the coach job

Shooting in India

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