Archive for the 'Tiro a volo' Category

The psychological skills of winning athletes

The psychological skills the athletes must show in competition and in training are often difficult to list, because the risk is to do a very long and too generic list. Nevertheless, today I would like to try to identify, from my point of view, the skills that can represent milestones in the athletes’ sport careers.

  • Self-control - it means knowing what are the behaviors to put in place to address the competition requests. The self-control requires respect for opponents; at the same time the athletes must be the leader of themselves, to overcome the difficulties posed by the races and opponents with the aim of providing the best performance.
  • Readiness for action - the athletes are persons oriented to act and therefore they must be ready to kick a ball, pulling a shot, to run in a precise rhythm, to anticipate opponents, to start rather than conclude effectively a race and so on. Readiness goes with high levels of situational awareness: the athletes have to know what to do at any given time and do it at their best.
  • Toughness and resiliency - I did not completely understand the distinction between these two psychological concepts, but I believe the athletes should continue to do the best even when they are tired, when all seems lost, during the decisive moments, at the end of the race, when they feel confused but know they have prepared an action plan for those moments.
  • Attention - Robert Nideffer said the attention is the only important thing in the decisive moments. I agree and, that is the reason, I consider it as the ability allowing to lead the mental commitment. The athletes have to know what to look for, knowing when to use a broad attentional style oriented toward the environment rather than a narrow attentional style, more focused on very few external factors. Without proper attention they cannot understand what is going to happen and to move in advance.
  • Optimism - The explanation of the performance results is an important factor, because it determines the expectation in relation to the future competitions. Humans are often engaged to explain their positive and negative results. It is therefore essential, the athletes develop an optimistic perception of their performances, because if they explain the positive results in term of luck or lack of competent opponents is unlikely they improve and gain a winning mind.

Webinar: Consulting with athletes with disabilities

American Psychological Association, Sport Psychology Division organizes first FREE webinar of 2019.

Please join us on March 19 12PM-1PM EST or 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM CET for the webinar on Consulting with Athletes with Disabilities! Great panelists and a great topic!

Registration:

https://register.gotowebinar.com/REGISTER/4936894466465835522

Which is your zone?

Some ideas for personal development as coach

Gary Curneen

Gary Curneen is the current assistant coach at Chicago Red Stars in the NWSL (women’s professional league).

He described some ideas for personal development tips for coaches. No bad to remember:

  • Always read books
  • Seek new information
  • Challenge current beliefs
  • Observe how others do things
  • Ask questions
  • Constantly reflect

 

 

 

Mindfulness can reduce the burnout

Chunxiao Li et al., (2019).Mindfulness and Athlete Burnout: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 449.

This review aims to identify, appraise, and synthesize studies reporting the relationship between mindfulness and athlete burnout and the effects of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) on athlete burnout. few variables may account for the relationship between mindfulness and athlete burnout.

Gustafsson et al. (2015) found that mindfulness had an indirect effect on athlete burnout through negative/positive affect. As negative affect has been viewed as an indicator of burnout susceptibility (Lemyre et al. 2006), mindfulness is likely to prevent burnout through adjusting athletes’ affect. Zhang and colleagues (2016) proposed another possible mechanism. They claimed that athletes with high levels of mindfulness tend to have low levels of experiential avoidance (i.e., willingness to avoid negative experience because of the distress brought on by the experience, which may in turn minimize the maladaptive influences of stressors and other negative factors on burnout.

How to understand the reasons of the success

To understand the success we have to stay focused less on the single victory and much more on what it has happened:

It always what happens before to determine what happens later

Book review: Promoting Active Lifestyles in Schools

Promoting Active Lifestyles in Schools

Jo Harris e Lorraine Cale

Human Kinetics 

2018, 128 pages

Promoting physical activity and consequently an active lifestyle has become in recent years an increasingly important topic to talk about, whereas instead we seem to be driven to lead an increasingly sedentary life. It then becomes essential to talk about movement when it is related to children and in a broader sense with young people: we know too well which and the negative results of the lack of physical activity, from the likely increase in weight to limitations in self-knowledge and to interactions with other peers.

I’m happy when books dedicated to this theme are published. At this regard, the book by Jo Harris and Lorraine Cale, entitled Promoting Active Lifestyles in Schools, is a stimulus for everyone, not only for teachers of physical education but also for parents and school managers or sports organizations, to ask what and how we can do more and better to promote a mentality in young people aimed at finding movement as a form of well-being, fun, play, collaboration but also challenge with themselves and their own peers.

It is a very well-articulated book. In the first part are presented topics about how to promote an active lifestyle in UK schools with activities promoting health, movement and fitness in the age group of infancy and adolescence. Particular attention is paid to the role of the school in promoting this approach to the movement and the contribution that physical education provides to the promotion of personal well-being is also outlined.

The other two parts of the book underline the monitoring modalities that should be carried out by the school relating to the three areas of health, physical activity and physical fitness. Furthermore, the third part highlights the learning of young people in the area of ​​health enhancing an active lifestyle. The learning of the young is strictly related to their age. The group age start from the age of 5-7 years going ahead with periods of two/three years up to 15-16 years.

The book is aimed at school teachers but it is certainly a useful reading for all those interested in promoting a physically active lifestyle among young people.

In every competition there positive and negative momentum

Too often athletes do not believe that in every competition there are positive but also negative moments and that this is condition happens  very frequently. Not foreseeing the difficulties are easily panicked, causing a worsening of their performance.

All things originate in the mind

All things originate in the mind. Actions and events depend heavily on motivation. Appreciation of humanity, compassion and love are key points. If we develop a good heart, whether our field is science, agriculture or politics, since motivation is so crucial, they’ll all improve.

Dalai Lama