Tag Archive for 'stile di vita'

10 reasons to walk everyday

Knowledge takes place through movement: start walking again at least half an hour every day.

  1. Walking awakens every muscle in the body, not just the legs.
  2. Walking is a time to spend with other people but also in solitude
  3. Walking improves our mood
  4. Walking is just for all ages
  5. Walking is the only activity in common with every human being from thousands of years
  6. Walking has been and is the primary activity to know and expand our territory
  7. Walking on one’s own legs is what parents teach their children
  8. Walking is the basis of running, jumping, throwing and any other form of movement.
  9. Walking into the nature stimulates watching, smelling and the sound of one’s own footsteps
  10. Walking is a free activity

How  do  you  want  to  be?

 

Risultati immagini per wall-e film tramaImmagine correlata

Physically active older adults live longer

Physically active older adults live longer with lower rates of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, cognitive decline, and osteoporosis. If that’s not enough incentive, they also enjoy more independence, balance, flexibility, cognitive function and improved self-esteem.

In order to reap these benefits, people over the age of 65 need at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous- physical activity per week according to Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines.

Looking for ways to incorporate more heart-pumping activity into your week?  Here are some tips to keep you moving:

1) INCORPORATE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTO YOUR REGULAR ROUTINE

Bending, squatting, stretching and lifting are all part of everyday activities such as gardening, grocery shopping, and even putting on your socks. Up the ante by sneaking in some resistance-type moves like doing some heavier digging or lifting of grocery bags. Even something as simple as berry picking or walking can strengthen your bones and muscles.

2) KEEP A MOVEMENT LOG

Those who track, stay on track! Noting your activity daily can really help you reach your fitness  goals. Use a wearable tracker, an app on your smartphone, or simply mark your progress in a calendar.

3) GET IN THE WATER

Water supports your body weight and adds resistance. Swim laps or look out for a local aquafit class which can help you build endurance and muscle strength. Many pools have accessible ramps making it easier to get in and out. The warmth of the water can also soothe aching joints.

4) EMBARK ON AN 8-WEEK WALKING PROGRAM

Walking is one of the safest and most enjoyable forms of fitness, not to mention it’s free! Aim for 15 min to start then gradually work your way up to 30 minutes per day. This is a great option for people with arthritis because it doesn’t put a lot of strain on the joints.

5) EXPLORE NEW ACTIVITIES

You’ve probably heard of tai chi (great for building strength and balance!), but have you ever tried geocaching? Participants use a GPS to find containers called geocaches. They’re hidden all over the world so you can participate anywhere. If that doesn’t appeal, go dancing, do yoga, or play pickleball. Trying something new will help keep you motivated and inspired!

6) PLAY IT SAFE

Whatever activity you choose, make sure to start slow, wear appropriate footwear, stay hydrated, and always check with your doctor before starting any new physical activity program.

How to win our laziness

19 years have passed from this interview on sedentary lifestyle but I would say the suggested tips to become more active are still valid.

Easy guidelines for an active life style among young people

Lifestyle and dementia

Lifestyle is responsible for up to 76% of changes in the ageing of the brain according to “Age UK and there are 5 steps people can take to maintain brain health and reduce their risk of developing dementia.

The review of academic studies and data reveals that about 76% of cognitive decline – changes in thinking skills with age including memory loss and speed of thinking – is accounted for by lifestyle and other environmental factors including level of education.

The finding from The Disconnected Mind, an Age UK funded research project into how thinking skills alter with age, which was part of the analysis, suggests that there is significant potential to influence these changes.

Furthermore, Age UK’s review, which included the latest international dementia studies, indicates that certain lifestyle factors – regular physical exercise, eating a Mediterranean diet, not smoking and drinking alcohol in moderation  – decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer’s, and other forms of dementia. In addition, preventing and treating diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity were also found to reduce the risk of dementia.

Exercise ‘most effective’ way to prevent cognitive decline

One large UK study carried out over 30 years found that men aged between 45 and 59 who followed 4-5 of the identified lifestyle factors were found to have a 36% lower risk of developing cognitive decline and a 36% lower risk of developing dementia than those who did not.

Age UK’s evidence review  also revealed  that physical exercise – aerobic, resistance or balance -  was the most effective way to ward off cognitive decline in healthy older people and reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Studies suggest that exercise 3 to 5 times a week for between 30 minutes and an hour is beneficial.

Significantly more cases of Alzheimer’s among smokers

But the evidence review also showed that a healthy diet, moderate alcohol intake and not smoking also play a role in ensuring healthy brain ageing  as well as reducing the risk of developing dementia.

It found that there are significantly more new cases of Alzheimer’s among current smokers compared with those who have never smoked.

The review also backed up claims that very heavy drinking is also linked to dementia, resulting in the loss of brain tissue particularly in the parts of the brain responsible for memory and processing and interpreting visual information.

Moderate levels of alcohol, however, were found to protect brain tissue by increasing good cholesterol and lowering bad cholesterol.

According to the latest estimates, there are 850,000 people in the UK living with dementia. It will affect one in three people over the age of 65.

‘There are simple and effective ways to reduce our risk’

Age UK hopes the new evidence will spur people to make changes which will help them reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director of Age UK said ‘While there’s still no cure or way to reverse dementia, this evidence shows that there are simple and effective ways to reduce our risk of developing it to begin with.

‘What’s more, the changes that we need to make to keep our brains healthy are already proven to be good for the heart and overall health, so it’s common sense for us all to try to build them into our lives. The sooner we start, the better our chance of having a healthy later life.”

(From Age UK)

New fields of mental coaching

The mental aspect of sport is not only related on technical or tactical training. This aspect is only part although important. I would say that the first aspect of the mental coaching concerns the implementation of the daily life of an athlete, and then his/her daily lifestyle. Nutrition, sleep, friends and family are significant aspects of the success. In many sports, for example, weight control is an essential aspect  of the performance and live in a conscious and positive these aspects increases the athlete well-being. Research conducted by the United States Olympic Committee found that family and friends are needed for success as they provide economic support, encouragement and emotional stability. The second aspect refers to the mental component of fitness. Feeling fit and ready to face any situation of their athletic performance is an essential part of self-confidence and viceversa. In fact, the motivation and the mental capacity to resist effectively to physical fatigue and exercise intensity promote the quality of the training sessions. Moreover, in many sports you should develop abilities not depending of other technical skills and who are however crucial to determine the result. I think the serve in volleyball and tennis, free throws in basketball, penalties in football, kicks in rugby, start in motor sports or sailing. These situations need to be trained mentally with accuracy.

Sport as a way of life in Europe

On 15 November in Florence, at the Palagio di Parte Guelfa, it will be held the Conference “Sport as a way of life in Europe,” an event sponsored by the National Agency for Youth. On this occasion the experts  all over the world and policy makers will discuss the issues related to the practice of sport in terms of promotion of healthy lifestyles. A tour that will visit medical and scientific issues, investigating the role of sport for the prevention and treatment of many diseases; town planning and architecture, with a focus on the redesign of the city according to the practice of outdoor sports and “zero kilometer”; legal and administrative probing new regulations, and comparing them with those of Europe, that promote the creation and management of sports organizations.

Information: National Youth Agency

 

Active life at World Master Games

We have to learn from Rune Haraldson (photo), Don Grenville and Michiko Hamuro respectively 95, 90 and 94 years old athletes at the World Masters Games in Turin to have an active lifestyle and not to be dominated by the idea to be old now for “these things “. We have to take their optimism and begin to believe that it is possible for us. There are sports for all ages, starting with the simple walk, and these athletes must help us as inspiration.

World Master Games è l'ora dei novantenni

Indoor air is bad and we breath it for too time

“Indoor air quality” refers to the quality of the air in a home, school, office, or other building environment. Most pollutants affecting indoor air quality come from sources inside buildings, although some originate outdoors. Typical pollutants of concern include combustion products such as carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and environmental tobacco smoke; substances of natural origin such as radon; biological agents such as molds; pesticides; lead; asbestos; ozone (from some air cleaners); and various volatile organic compounds from a variety of products and materials. Indoor concentrations of some pollutants have increased in recent decades due to such factors as energy-efficient building construction and increased use of synthetic building materials, furnishings, personal care products, pesticides, and household cleaners.

The potential impact of indoor air quality on human health nationally is considerable, for several reasons. Americans, on average, spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors, where the concentrations of some pollutants are often 2 to 5 times higher than typical outdoor concentrations. Moreover, people who are often most susceptible to the adverse effects of pollution (e.g., the very young, older adults, people with cardiovascular or respiratory disease) tend to spend even more time indoors. Health effects that have been associated with indoor air pollutants include irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat; headaches, dizziness, and fatigue; respiratory diseases; heart disease; and cancer.

From: United States Environmental Protection agency

For the politicians sport is not in agenda

To increase  at least of 10% the people who lead a physically active lifestyle should be part of any government project, when we talk about?

Read more on: http://www.huffingtonpost.it/alberto-cei/per-i-politici-lo-sport-n_b_2245751.html?utm_hp_ref=italy