Tag Archive for 'runner'

Too much facebook and doping among runners

I read long excerpts from Carlo Esposito’s book on doping in the amateur running race entitled “Inferno 2019″. It documents what a terrible thing happens, bringing those who practice it closer to the multi-dopaths of top sport.

The author highlights the role of facebook in amplifying this phenomenon. This juxtaposition is not surprising, since it is a container used to cultivate the pathological narcissism of these people. The performance improvements that are achieved with doping and drug abuse become a way to gain status and popularity. Facebook is the space for spreading this self-image.

Doping like financial fraud is based on the concept of deception. I described how it happens in my book “The Lords of Traps”. Here I quote the definition.

For cognitive psychology “a deception is an act or trait of an M organism that has the purpose of not letting an I organism have true knowledge that is relevant to that organism, and that does not reveal that purpose” (Castelfranchi e Poggi, 1998, p.55). In this sense, it is an action that makes sense to perform only if one is inserted within a certain relational and social context, since it is precisely in that context that M and I subjects live, for whom fraud takes on meaning.

The concept of act referred to when talking about fraud essentially concerns conscious processes, carried out intentionally. In fact, the act of doping consists essentially in actions that are characterized in volunteer terms in the search for fraud strategies and ways to implement them. One of the disturbing and sensational aspects of this phenomenon certainly concerns the great social importance of the deception warped against those who, in top-level sport, admire these athletes for their exceptional sporting performance. This highlights another crucial component of the fraud process: the relevance of deception to the deceived. In fact, the lack of knowledge on the part of others, whether they are mere fans or opponents, of the real condition of the athlete, occurs through the theft of essential information, preventing the correct evaluation of the performance of doped athletes. In other words, it is made to believe the false, to the detriment of making the truth known.

Finally, the process of deception includes a further aspect, related to not letting the deceived know that he is being deceived. When you falsify, you do exactly this kind of operation, you give false information, with the declared intention of making people believe it to be true, and you take actions to convince the deceived of the goodness of what is being claimed.

Regardless of the fact that these abuses concern doping carried out to provide excellent performance at the Olympics, rather than that more simply practiced by recreational athletes, all the frauds have three elements in common that when compared with those used by Castelfranchi and Poggi to describe the process of deception are thus associated:

  • they are carried out in a secret way and this dimension can be attributed to the factor called meta-deception.
  • violate the relationship of trust between those who carries it out and the organisation/sporting environment that is a victim of it and, therefore, are based on the non-truth factor
  • are intended to bring economic and/or social benefits to fraudsters and, therefore, are identified in terms of their specific purpose.

IAAF cuts the long distance rave from Diamond League

Unwarranted IAAF  decision to cut the long distance races from the Diamond League circuit, when runners are the main public of athletics. Perhaps because the strongest are Africans?

Do you want to know how the runner train themselves?

Are you a runner?

Be one of the participants of the study to know how long distance runners train themselves in preparation of the marathon and which is their habits toward the run they practice. You need only few minutes. Click here and start this run.

The numbers of the marathon in Italy

The strenuous physical activity tends to decrease in most animals with increasing age. In humans this is not always true, because it is noted today a significant increase of individuals who continue to remain physically active even when they are older.

In recent years the worldwide success is experiencing the marathon (42.195 km) is a demonstration of this track.

  • In Italy 2018, 37,874 individuals whose 6,872 are women have been finishers.
  • It is increased the number of runners who run the marathon with times from four hours and thirty minutes: this year were 9508, corresponding to an increase of 25% compared to 2017.
  • In our country, just 43 athletes have raced in less than two hours and thirty equivalent to a decrease of 23.2% compared to 2017.
  • Even the group between three hours and three hours and thirty decreased of 28.6% and it corresponds to 6,553 individuals.
  • The largest number of finishers was between three hours forty five and four hours: 4,752 (- 5.8% compared to the previous year).
He’s probably right Daniele Menarini explaining these data of the increased of the slow-running as linked to the diffusion of fitwalking and nordic walking. The marathon continues to be a challenge with oneself also at low speeds. Accepting this approach can lead to a conception of this race as a motivating experience even for those who do not run (or walk) with the logic of time but to live an experience that as a citizen is still extreme. Menarini suggests at this regard to increase the maximum time to accommodate more participants, following the spirit of what is happening in Japan. Murakami Haruki, the writer-marathoner, reminds us:

“In long-distance running the only opponent you have to beat is yourself, the way you used to be.”

Are you a runner? Take part at one study about them

If you are a runner, take part in this research carried out by Italian Track&Field Federation to learn how you train and what are the main reasons of your involvement in this sport. Click on the figure and go to the page where you will find the questionnaire. Take part in getting to know the world of run lovers.

The experiences of ultramarathon runners

Review

“It’s Not about Taking the Easy Road”: The Experiences of Ultramarathon Runners

Duncan Simpson,  Phillip G. Post,  Greg Young,  Peter R. Jensen 

The Sport Psychologist, 2014, 28, 176-185

Ultramarathon (UM) running consists of competitive footraces over any distance longer than a marathon, which is 26.2 miles  The distances of UM races vary from 31 to over 100 miles and are often distinct due to the challenging environments in which they take place (e.g., forests, mountains, jungle, and desert).

Research that has been conducted has primarily examined the sport motivations, changes in mood states, and sport-specific cognitions of UM runners. Research on UM participant motivations suggest that these athletes compete to experience feelings of personal achievement, to overcome challenges, socialize with other runners, and to be in nature.

Evaluations of UM runners’ cognitive orientations, race thoughts and mental strategies indicate that these runners are more confident, committed to running, have higher goal-orientations compared with other athletes, use dissociative thoughts (e.g., thinking of friends, music) and use several mental skills (i.e., imagery, goal setting, self-talk).

Results

The present study explored UM runners’ experiences of training and competition using the method of existential phenomenological interviewing: 26 participants ranging in age from 32 to 67 years.

UM Community was the most prominent theme that emerged from the interviews. Specifically, these participants perceived the UM community helped them to effectively prepare for events (e.g., obtain information on how to train), manage in race demands (e.g., support from crew members), discover new environments (e.g., running new races) and enhanced their sense of personal achievement (e.g., the exclusivity of the small number of individuals participating in UM).

UM Preparation/strategy highlights the amount of time, dedication, and personal sacrifice needed to be a successful UM runner. While prior research indicates that training hours are key predictors of success, it does not adequately describe the dedication and sacrifice made by these runners. UM runners train for long periods of time without large incentives (e.g., monetary rewards, sponsorships) or established training protocols (e.g., coach, training guidelines). To train effectively these UM runners often sacrificed social relationships, family, and work needs. Therefore, the incentive to train and decisions about nutritional/training needs largely rested with each individual.

UM Management is consistent with prior UM research examining cognitive strategies and goal orientations. With regard to goal orientations, prior research suggests that UM runners focus on task goals (i.e., process) more than outcome goals (i.e., winning the race). This was supported in the current study, with the majority of participants indicating that they were primarily focused on simply doing their best. This included running specific time goals or simply finishing the event within the allotted time. In terms of cognitive strategies, participants described using goal setting, self-talk, attentional focus strategies, cognitive restructuring and imagery to assist with managing the physical and mental demands of the race.

UM major factor in dealing with pain was being able to accept the pain. Specifically, before the race participants acknowledged that the run was going to hurt, and as long as the pain did not exceed a certain threshold, it was viewed as a normal aspect of the race. Several runners also described using associative strategies to manage pain.

UM Discovery and personal achievement suggest that UM are motivated to participate in these races to experience personal achievement, to push themselves beyond their perceived capabilities, and to experience nature. Discovery was also about exploring the unknown, overcoming fear, and unveiling new personal insights (e.g., that they were capable of running a much farther distance than they thought possible).

 

A marathon among the lions

 The 15th annual Safaricom Marathon has taken place at Lewa on Saturday 28th June 2014. Organised by Tusk Trust and supported by Safaricom, this fundraising event hosted 1,000 runners from over 20 different countries. The Safaricom Marathon is regarded as one of the toughest marathons in the world. However, runners of all abilities take part, from fun runners, walkers and amateurs, to professionals like Paul Tergat the Kenyan international and former world record holder. The impact of the event has been huge and the benefits are very tangible. Since its inception the event has raised over $4.2 million. Tusk and Lewa have always shared a common goal to use wildlife conservation as a catalyst to alleviate poverty, reduce conflict, and improve education and livelihoods in rural areas rich in biodiversity.

 

Running and meditation

Accomplished runner and leader of Shambhala, Sakyong Mipham has found physical activity to be essential for spiritual well-being. In this practical and inspiring book, he offers simple lessons that meld mindfulness with physical movement which can be used by anyone – regardless of age, spiritual background, or ability. The result is an enhanced way of life – more energy, more focus, more patience – that will appeal to runners, spiritual seekers and anyone interested in great health and wellbeing.

(http://runningmind.org/)