Tag Archive for 'performance'

Be aware of our strength points

One difficulty of the athletes, and to a greater extent the younger ones, is related to talking about their strengths, while they are much more focused on talking about their mistakes.

Certainly it is not wrong to be aware of the mistakes and to be focused to overcoming them with training.

The opposite is valid in competition. It’s more useful to focus on what to do to compete at the best and this only happens by putting the best skills in action.

Athletes often say: “I’m very focused on improving myself and I think little about what I’m able to do.”

The objective should be twofold: to train to improve but also to be aware of our skills (physical, technical-tactical and mental).

For example, we can start from the performance goals and stimulate athletes to identify the skills they need to achieve them, in other words, stimulate them to reflect and write down what their strengths are, what they do when competing at their best, so as to put in their mental desktop the skills to use in the race and especially those that want to use more when they are under pressure.

To cope with our opponent fear

Tackling one’s fears is a fundamental aspect of young athletes training. Talking about the fears that you feel during the competitions permits to understand that they are part of the competitive commitment and not a symptom of  psychological problems. So, we talk to our athletes about their fears, what blocks them during a game, what are the situations determining this emotion.
Often athletes complain of having competed against opponents stronger than themselves, it happens in team sports but also in sport of opposition (from tennis to boxing, from fencing to wrestling). So what do we do? Do we adapt to this fear and give up because in our minds the result seems obvious? I would say that this is what often happens. Maybe even with the participation of coaches who conceive fear as an emotion of  weak person or themselves do not know how to train the competitive confidence in their athletes.

As performance and sport psychologists we have a duty to pass on the idea, to coaches and athletes, that with the daily work we will overcome the fears. So we deal with this issue openly with the athletes asking: “What are your worst fears?” Let them express in relation to the behaviors they show in these moments and then we start with them a work based on awareness, on the redefinition of fear as a step in the psychological development of the athlete and teach them the psychological strategies and techniques, which are however closely related to the type of sport and the characteristics of each athlete.

How to live the worst performances

I want to propose again this blog. The reason is that is so important to react constructively to the bad results. it’s not an easy condition for every athletes, but if you want to improve you need to learn how to live these moments. One again the experience of great champion, like Tiger Woods, leads to find this difficult solution. It is very useful for the young athletes too.

If you are a champion you do figure out how to address the losses and Tiger Woods definitely  is.

One day after the worst score of his career, Tiger Woods played the final round of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide just like it was any other Sunday. He wore his red shirt. He played at the same pace. He tossed blades of grass in the air to judge the wind and crouched to read important putts. The only difference was he played as a single. He even removed a flagstick by himself when his caddie was busy raking a bunker.

“Just because I’m in last place doesn’t change how I play golf,” he said. “Whether it’s the first day or last day, doesn’t matter. Play all out.”

This is a lonely sport,” Woods said. “The manager is not going to come in and bring the righty or bring the lefty. You’ve just got to play through it. And that’s one of the hardest things about the game of golf, and it’s also one of the best things about the game of golf. When you’re on, no one is going to slow you down. When you’re off, no one is going to pick you up, either. It’s one of those sports that’s tough. Deal with it.

Attention is the only relevant thing in the crucial moments.

Give yourself the winning advantage we call “global fitness”.

In business, as in sport, the competitive arena is now worldwide. Technical and tactical advantages are rapidly disappearing. With deadlines tighter and pressure to perform increasing, the ability to control concentration and emotions is critical. That’s where we come in. Our performance-enhancement systems combine sport and business psychological research to give you the winning edge. When we use terms like coaching, team building, and competition, we know what we’re talking about.

PAY ATTENTION

Ask yourself what the best business executives have in common with elite athletes and Navy SEALS — the ability to pay attention, to avoid becoming distracted and remain focused on the task at hand. Whether you are a business executive or an athlete — you can’t perform effectively if you can’t concentrate. Mistakes break deals and lose games.

 

THE INVENTORY: THE TAIS

EPS has developed the most effective tool in the industry for assessing attentional and interpersonal skills enabling individuals, teams, and companies to perform better. Unlike many other programs, Enhanced Performance Systems employs a performance-based instrument — The Attentional & Interpersonal Style (TAIS) inventory — to gain crucial information useful over a wide range of applications from executive coaching to employee selection and screening.

TAIS inventory is a 144-item, performance-based, self-report inventory. Derived from the Theory of Attentional and Interpersonal Style, TAIS inventory provides a direct link between the concentration and personality characteristics measured and performance. TAIS is designed to increase the ability to understand, predict, and control behavior of highly effective individuals. It is the only inventory of its kind in the world.

GIVE MORE THAN LIP SERVICE TO COACHING

It is no surprise that sports metaphors are widely used in business. Both arenas employ strategic planning, emphasize competition, and demand performance under pressure. EPS was founded by one of the country’s leading sport psychologists, Dr. Robert Nideffer. TAIS and ACT have been used to enhance the performance of some of the world’s most talented athletes and teams. Why is it an advantage to have a background in sport and coaching and an instrument that has been tested in the athletic arena? Because, unlike in business where mistakes may take years to be detected and where improvements are often measured subjectively, in sport, it’s crystal clear what works and what doesn’t. You can’t charm your way to a four-minute mile and money won’t buy you a seventy at Pebble Beach Golf Course.

For more information contact: info@ceiconsulting.it